BSc (Hons)

Psychology with Criminology

Student sitting at desk using pc
  • Level(s) of study: Undergraduate
  • Study mode(s): Full-time / Sandwich
  • Location: City Campus
  • Starting: September 2018
  • Course duration: Three years full-time / Four years placement

Our students would recommend us! In the latest National Student Survey 95% of our recent BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology students would recommend studying at NTU. (National Student Survey 2017).

This engaging British Psychology Society (BPS) accredited Psychology with Criminology degree combines a comprehensive training in Psychology with the study of criminal behaviour, types of crime, and knowledge of the criminal justice system. Our students benefit from over 80 academic experts and weekly research seminars, and have access to first-class laboratory suites.

The course covers all the core areas of Psychology stipulated by the BPS curriculum. This accounts for two-thirds of the course, and includes the workings of the brain; the processes and mechanisms of human thinking, feeling and behaviour; and how psychologists, psychological research and therapy can make a tangible and positive difference to people’s lives and society. The remaining third of the curriculum considers the social-cultural implications of crime and criminality, and the contexts in which crimes are committed and understood.

Degree Options:

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology C8M2

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology (Sandwich) C8M3 – this is a four-year course that includes a work placement year.

Why choose this course?

Teaching and Research Excellence

By joining a psychology course at NTU you’ll be part of a research active community.

  • You’ll design and carry out your own research in your final year and you may have the opportunity to compete for paid work as a research assistant between Year Two and Three.
  • 60% of our research outputs were considered to be internationally excellent or world leading in REF 2014 and 100% of our research impact is internationally excellent with 73% described as world leading.
  • 92% of BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology full-time students agree that staff are good at explaining things (National Student Survey 2017).

Professional skills and recognition

  • Our Psychology courses* are accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) so as long as you graduate with at least a 2.2 honours degree you will be eligible to receive the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the BPS – a necessary qualification if you wish to pursue further training and a career as a professional psychologist.
  • You can gain practical experience between Years Two and Three as well as undertake a work placement or study abroad at one of our partner institutions.
  • You also have the option of choosing to complete a four year course which includes a year-long work placement.
  • In your final year you'll get the opportunity to take part in our Professional Practice in Psychology module. Offering you the chance to experience life as a consultant psychologist, providing psychological solutions to real-world problems.

* does not include Psychology courses in Nottingham Law School, or Nottingham Institute of Education

A personalised experience

  • Tailor your learning experience – with a range of optional modules and pathways, you can pursue your own interests and begin to shape your learning towards further study and / or a particular career.
  • You will have the chance to tailor-make your studies by choosing options from a unique blend of modules across two subjects.

Expert staff and specialist facilities

  • Study in one of the largest psychology departments in the UK. You will be taught and supervised by over 90 expert psychologists who have a diverse range of interests and research areas.
  • You'll be able to take full advantage of our excellent teaching laboratory suite. The facilities and equipment are exclusively for our psychology students, and will help you carry out your own research and data analysis.

What you'll study

*We are currently reviewing the content of our courses to ensure that they remain relevant and current to our students’ future ambitions and to society. Please continue to check this course webpage for the latest developments.

In the first two years of your degree, you'll complete an introduction to psychology and core modules in biological, social, developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as undertaking training in research methods and statistics.

In criminology, you'll complete additional modules covering criminal behaviour, crime and society, the criminal justice system, issues in contemporary policing, and penology.

In your final year, you'll sit a further core module in psychology, and can tailor your studies (often with a view to future employment opportunities) by choosing from a range of optional psychology and criminology modules. In your final year, you'll also complete a research project in psychology, focused on a topic of your choosing under the supervision of a research-active member of staff.

You can also take part in the innovative Professional Practice in Psychology module, a unique feature of psychology at NTU. Taking on the role of a consultant psychologist, you will work on real-life problem scenarios supplied by external organisations, and provide evidence-based solutions to these organisations.

Four-year placement course

You also have the option of choosing to complete a four-year course that includes a year-long work placement in between Year Two and Year Three. You must apply with the UCAS code C8M3 to be considered for the four-year sandwich or placement course.

Study abroad

If you are on the three-year full-time course, you may also have the chance to study abroad at one of our partner universities. Our current partner institutions include locations such as Australia, the USA, Hungary, the Netherlands and Poland. You'll decide early on in your first year if you would like to apply to take part in the exchange programme. You would study abroad between Year Two and Year Three, and it would therefore involve extending the course length to four years. The study abroad option is only available for students on the three-year full-time route, and therefore you must apply with the UCAS code C8M2.

  • Year One

    Core modules

    Introduction to Psychology
    You will examine how psychology research is conducted and interpreted; a range of perspectives in psychology, including comparative psychology; psychopathology and cognition; key studies and theories in psychology; and current developments in psychology. You will study in detail historically important approaches to psychology. There is also a practical focus on the levels of analysis at which psychologists work, and the relationship between psychological theories and everyday human behaviour and experience.

    Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
    You will develop a clear understanding of the UK criminal justice system, in particular its origins, structure, functions and development, as well as examining the impact of social issues such as gender, age, ethnicity and social class upon and within the system. The module explores the key underpinnings of the criminal justice system, including the central management organisations – most notably the Home Office and the Ministry of Justice – and the core agencies that operate within the system, such as police, prison and probation services. You will also study key developments occurring within the UK criminal justice process, whilst also noting the influence of international models on the UK, including the "victim movement" and the increasingly victim-centred nature of the criminal justice system.

    Understanding Crime and Society
    Crime cannot be understood without taking into consideration a range of socio-economic circumstances and aspects of social change. You will explore a range of contextual factors that impact upon the nature and level of crime, and which also shape how crime is responded to both by government organisations and wider society.

    The module is divided into three distinct components:

    • Part A – Understanding the changing nature of society
      Key socio-economic developments and changes within contemporary society: an overview of key issues and trends relating to inequality, deprivation, social class, ethnicity, gender, family, drugs, etc.
    • Part B – Understanding the relationship between place, people and crime in Nottingham
      This component uses the Chicago School’s concept of zones of transition and stability to explore the presence of crime hotspots within Nottingham. An introduction to environmental criminology and the Chicago School approach will be complimented by a series of field trips to real zones of transition and stability within the City.
    • Part C – Developing stakeholder-orientated crime profiles of localities within Greater Nottingham
      This final component of the module provides students with an opportunity to apply the generic socio-economic themes from Part A, along with the Chicago School framework developed in Part B, to the study of crime within a specific locality. Extending the focus beyond the city core, Part C of the module utilises student-led case studies to develop crime profiles of neighbourhoods on the fringes of the city, and within satellite market towns and rural communities from around Nottingham.

    Research Methods in Psychology
    An introduction to a variety of research methods used in psychology. You have the opportunity to develop and practice report-writing skills, understand experimentation and self-report methods, and gain practical experience. You will run and report upon your study in groups. You will be required to formulate hypotheses, search for and review any relevant literature in the library, prepare necessary materials or instruments, select a sample, collect and analyse data using appropriate statistical techniques, interpret the findings, and produce an individual written report of the work undertaken.

    Statistics (One)
    Study the fundamental concepts and practices of statistical data analysis in psychology. By the end of the module, you should be able to design research studies in psychology, and be familiar with a range of descriptive, nonparametric and parametric statistics. The module is assessed by one examination at the end. Continuous feedback throughout the year will help you progress, help you develop your skills, and act as a resource to draw upon when conducting research.

    Explaining Criminal Behaviour
    Explore the theoretical explanations for crime and criminality adopted by schools of thought from disciplines such as sociology, psychology, and criminology. You will identify developments in criminological thought, the role of criminology in society from the medieval era through to contemporary trends in criminological thought, and you will examine the role of criminological theory in criminal justice practice. Key themes to be covered in this module typically include: the origins of explaining criminal behaviour; crime and pre-modernity; the rational actor model of crime and criminal behaviour (Classicism, right realism, contemporary rational actor theories); the predestined actor model of crime and criminal behaviour (biological, psychological and sociological positivisms); crime and the post-modern condition; crime and the future of criminology; and applying psychology-based theories to different types of crime.

  • Year Two

    Core modules

    Cognitive and Biological Psychology
    Study the cognitive and biological perspective of psychology, encountering concepts and research methodologies in topics such as memory, attention, sensation, and perception. You will be introduced to the structure and function of the brain and allied structures; the language of biological psychology; the main approaches taken in behavioural neuroscience, such as functional neuroanatomy and functional neurophysiology; a range of biological, evolutionary and genetic influences that affect human behaviour and experience; basic cognitive processes; and the relationship between cognitive approaches and other approaches in psychology. You will also consider the applications of cognitive psychology in accounting for everyday processes and in improving human performance.

    Social and Lifespan Developmental Psychology
    Examine social and lifespan developmental aspects of psychology, including: the major theories and methodological approaches in social and developmental psychology; the range of development across a person’s lifespan; the diversity of development of individuals and groups across age, time, culture and place; and the relationship between theories in social psychology and an everyday understanding of social behaviour.

    Research Methods and Statistics (Two)
    An integrated module studying advanced experimental, psychometric, and qualitative research techniques in laboratory practicals. Supporting this are a series of lectures and workshops designed to help you develop your statistical knowledge and skills. Laboratory work will involve one experimental and one regression-based study, and one study involving a free choice of method. All studies will be on an area relevant to psychology. You will be organised into small groups, and each group will have to run and report upon their study. You will also be required to formulate hypotheses, search for and review relevant literature, prepare or select necessary stimuli or scales, select a sample, collect and analyse data appropriately, interpret findings, and produce individual reports of the work undertaken. The module will also build upon the content of Statistics (One). Particular emphasis will be placed on factorial ANOVA and the concept of interaction. You will also consider the theory and statistical techniques associated primarily with non-experimental research. These include multiple regression, Cronbach’s alpha, multiple correlations, and exploratory factor analysis.

    Penology
    Take a critical approach to theoretical and practical understandings of punishment, penality and penal institutions in England and Wales. This module seeks to provide an appreciation of the evolution, conditions and structure of the modern penal system, and the challenges that the current incarnation of penal administration – the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) – faces in delivering effective penal policy in England and Wales. The module sets the political, economic, structural and societal context within which NOMS operates, and covers the impact of these on NOMS' ability to: deliver effective punishments; protect the public from offenders; protect communities from the impact of crime;, reduce re-offending; take account of the needs, wishes and rights of the victims of crime; and rehabilitate offenders. Finally, the module introduces and discusses key debates in penology and considers the future of punishment delivery. For example, to what extent will the privatisation of "punishment and justice" achieve the stipulated aim of "transforming rehabilitation"?

    Policing
    Examining the development and current status of the police service in England and Wales, with particular attention paid to structure, functions, powers and culture. The module aims to provide you with an appreciation of the core principles that underpin policing whilst also examining how the police service operates; the police officer’s law enforcement powers; and the role of the police in the criminal justice process. By focusing on a number of contemporary issues and theoretical debates in crime and policy, it demonstrates the importance of situating the police and policing into a wider socio-economic and political context whilst also evaluating the impact of national influences on different aspects of police work.

  • Final year

    Core modules

    Psychology Research Project
    A major piece of work whereby you will carry out independent research, the topic and design of which is decided upon in consultation with a supervisor. The project will demonstrate that you can conduct an extended research report, as well as show your understanding of the methodological skills and presentational techniques developed throughout the course.

    Professional Practice in Psychology
    Addressing aspects of professional psychology, you will work on a problem from a set of professional scenarios and form a project team to address the problem.The first half of the module addresses a single area of professional practice; theory and application of occupational and organisational psychology. The second half of the module uses problem-based learning methods to give you an experience of professional project work across a broader range of applied areas of interest. Students select a problem from a set of professional scenarios and form a project team to address the problem. The project team work as a group to produce an executive summary and presentation of their proposed solution to the problem.

    Advanced Psychology - choose between the following:
    Students select a module in either Advanced Social and Developmental Psychology or Advanced Cognitive and Biological Psychology. These modules involve exploring these core areas of psychology in more depth and will develop your critical analysis skills on these areas.

    Advanced Cognitive and Biological Psychology
    This advanced psychology module aims to give students further insight into biological and cognitive material, building on the basic knowledge acquired in Year Two. In particular you will be encourage to develop a reflective understating of the anatomy and physiological processes that underpin psychological experience, develop an understand of the methodologies used to examine issues in biological psychology, critically examine how contemporary bio-psychological models are developed and evaluate them as explanations of behaviour, develop a thorough understanding of how various cognitive psychological constructs can be used to theorise mental functioning in a range of domains, and develop an in-depth understanding of the cognitive processes that underlie the performance of several different everyday tasks and have an understanding of relevant research evidence, and of how research relates to theory, to be able to critically evaluate different accounts of cognitive functioning in specific domains.

    Advanced Social and Developmental Psychology
    This module will build on the Year Two Social and Lifespan Developmental Psychology module. You will further explore child development and its relationship to a child’s genetics and environment, childhood, education and family, attachment and emotional development, adolescence, Language development, cognitive processing and development, difficulties in children’s development, social categorisation, social identity, Pro-social behaviour, processes of social influence and intergroup relations. You will also develop knowledge and understanding of social psychological processes, be able to contextualise the development and use of social and developmental psychological theory and research and build on your understanding of how evidence from investigations can inform theory and practice, provide in-depth discussions of a set of contemporary applied issues in social and developmental psychology, evaluate the relevance of theory and research in social and developmental psychology to specific areas of application and become a critical reader of the research literature.

    Optional modules

    Choose one from a selection of optional Psychology modules that may include:

    Trauma in Children and Adolescents
    The aim of the module is to provide theoretical understanding of the impact of childhood trauma on children and adolescents, and to provide an understanding of the role and roots of resilience. The module seeks to provide students with knowledge about the signs and symptoms, behavioural patterns, and underlying psychological and biological changes associated with psychopathology after childhood and adolescent trauma.

    Health Psychology
    Health psychology is an interdisciplinary field, concerned with the application of psychological knowledge to health, illness and healthcare. Its primary purpose is to understand and improve the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. This module will introduce students to some of the core areas within the field, exploring key concepts used in the study of both healthy and ill populations. The module will cover contemporary psychological theories of health and illness from a number of perspectives, and will draw upon research that has used a variety of methodological approaches. For example, we will explore psychological perspectives on behaviours which pose a risk to health (such as smoking, obesity and exercise), consider what happens when we get ill (e.g. seeking help, medicine taking behaviour and adjustment to illness) and explore how psychologists can help people who are dying and suffering from bereavement. Particular focus will be given to how theory can be used to inform practice and the development of interventions.

    Psychopathology
    It has been estimated that mental illness accounts for a third of all illnesses in the UK, and a quarter of the population will be affected at some point in the lifespan. The overarching aim of this module is to develop students’ knowledge of mental disorders and topics relevant to clinical psychology. Specifically, this module aims to: provide students with comprehensive knowledge of psychological disorders in adults and psychological and developmental disorders in children; provide awareness about current clinical practice such as commonly adopted classification (DSM-V) and recommended treatments (NICE guidelines); develop students’ understanding of theory, research and current issues around clinical psychology and consider their impact; critically evaluate recent psychological research and scrutinise its application to contemporary clinical practice; and encourage consideration of multiple viewpoints and critically examine different approaches in the field.

    Criminological Psychology
    Criminological psychology focuses on the application of psychology to legal processes and the criminal justice system as well as the understanding of offending behaviour.

    Cyberpsychology
    Study the impact of the Internet and new technologies on our social relationships and the ways we relate to each other, as well as more technical aspects of cyberpsychology and philosophical issues relating to how we do, might, or should interact within virtual environments.

    Gender, Identity and Body Image
    Taking a social constructionist stance you will challenge the taken for granted ‘obviousness’ of our assumptions about a number of issues relating to gender, identity and body image.

    The Psychology of Sex
    Sexual behaviour is central to our lives, yet its importance to our happiness and well-being often goes unrecognised. In this module, human sexuality will be explored. The origins of international, crosscultural and religious views on sex will be examined along with a detailed review of the key methodologies and theories within this area of research. Important, applied, topics such as the origins of sexual orientation, sexual coercion and sex education will be covered. Specific issues that will be covered in depth include: historical perspectives on sexuality; international perspectives on sexuality; sex and relationship research methodologies; sexual anatomy and reproductive physiology; sexual arousal and response patterns; the psychobiological basis to sexual orientation, non-heterosexual sexuality and sex and relationship problems.

    Psychology of Religion
    Why does religion exist? What function does it serve in society? What’s the difference between a cult and a religion? What is the difference between a psychotic hallucination and a religious vision? What is the role of religion and spirituality in everyday life? How might it contribute to our wellbeing? How might religious practices have something to offer society (e.g. mindfulness practice of Buddhism). These are the sorts of questions that will be explored in this module. Lectures will typically include: the historical and cultural background to religion and spirituality; the evolutionary, biological, social and cognitive explanations for religion; understanding cults and why people join them; the psychology of religious and spiritual experiences and practices.

    Psychoanalysis: The Theory and Practice
    This module explores the works of classical themes in psychoanalysis from a practical and clinical perspective: Oedipus Complex, Narcissism, the Unconscious, Splitting and Bonding, Transference and Counter-transference, Good and Bad Objects, Development of the Self, Projection and Projective Identification, Empathy, and Anger and Aggression.

    Occupational Psychology
    Occupational Psychology is concerned with the application of psychological knowledge for the understanding of individual behaviour in organisations and workplaces.

    Choose one from a selection of optional Criminology modules that may include:

    Young People, Crime and Justice
    Critically explore the youth justice system in the UK and the responses to juvenile justice.

    Sexual and Violent Crimes
    Study sexual and violent offending within a theoretical context and the response to this type of offending.

    Drugs and Society
    This module provides a detailed understanding of the wider social context of drug use, together with an examination of the effects of drug consumption and addiction on individual users

    International Crime
    This module develops your awareness of the problems associated with: i) transnational crime; ii) crime issues of significance to the international community; iii) the social, political, legal and policy difficulties associated with such crime types.

    Hi-Tech Crime
    Examine the evolution and dynamics of offending and the implications for wider society and deviance taking place on the Internet.

    Miscarriages of Justice
    Explore the problems surrounding the delivery of justice in England and Wales through a comprehensive analysis of the nature, scale and impact of miscarriages of justice.

    The number of places available on some optional modules may be limited. These will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Students who are unable to select their first choice will be offered an alternative from the remaining optional modules.

Course specification

View the full course specification
Please note that course specifications may be subject to change

Tailor your learning experience with a range of optional modules. This will give you the chance to pursue your own interests and begin to shape your learning towards further study and / or a particular career.

How you’re taught

The BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology is taught by experienced staff used to dealing with students from a range of backgrounds and with varying levels of skill and experience.

To provide you with a first-class learning experience, and to guarantee you have an opportunity to make the most of your time at university, you will receive contact time through a diverse range of delivery methods, including  lectures, workshops, and one-on-one supervision. The smaller group sessions provide opportunities to develop:

  • problem-solving skills
  • group working skills
  • analytical skills
  • debating skills
  • presentation skills
  • research and data analysis skills.

Tutorials with staff

Students are supported throughout the course via a tutorial system. These small group meetings allow the students contact with an individual member of staff, who will help them with study skills and advice about the course and curriculum. At these sessions, you will also have the opportunity to:

  • discuss and gain feedback about your work
  • ask questions about the projects you're working on
  • raise any difficulties you are experiencing relating to your work, personal circumstances or your university experience.

Independent study

Independent study is an important part of this course. Throughout the three years of your course, you will develop the skills required to undertake an independent research study in the form of a final year research project. Our final year students conduct research projects in a wide range of areas in psychology, some of which have been successfully published.

How will I be assessed?

You'll be assessed in a variety of ways and on a modular basis – through traditional means such as examinations and essays, but also in more innovative ways such as research reports, oral and poster presentations, and by a final year research project. Our diverse approach to assessment allows students to demonstrate the breadth of their abilities and provides opportunity for everyone to excel.

The range of assessment tools has been acknowledged as one of the strengths of the course by the BPS Accreditation Committee and External Examiners.

In response to student feedback, the University have introduced a policy ensuring marked work is returned to you electronically within three weeks of submission.

Learning from experts

Our lecturers are highly respected researchers who conduct innovative research in their specialist areas. Research groups include:

  • Addiction and Aberrant Behaviours
  • Wellbeing
  • Development, Interaction and Social Relations
  • Language and Psycholinguistics
  • Cognition

There are also a range of research units including:

  • The International Gaming Research Unit
  • Emergency Services Research Unit
  • Specific Language Impairment Research Unit
  • Sexual Offences, Crime and Misconduct Research Unit

In addition to the traditional lectures, tutorials and independent study, you will also hear and learn from renowned experts and professionals in related fields who are regularly invited to come and talk to our students, providing you with an insight into their specialist knowledge and experiences.

You'll get the opportunity to attend the Department of Psychology seminar series that takes place throughout the academic year. The seminars invite experts and professionals to present their publications and research findings. This is an integral part of the research culture in the Psychology Department and stimulates thinking and debate.

Assessment methods

  • Full Time Year 1 coursework (40%), written (58%) and practical (2%)
  • Full Time Year 2 coursework (42%), written (41%) and practical (17%)
  • Full Time Year 3 coursework (58%), written (17%) and practical (25%)
  • Sandwich Year 1 coursework (40%), written (58%) and practical (2%)
  • Sandwich Year 2 coursework (42%), written (41%) and practical (17%)
  • Sandwich Year 3
  • Sandwich Year 4 coursework (58%), written (17%) and practical (25%)

Contact hours

A full-time student on average can expect to spend 1200 hours a year learning which will typically be broken down as follows:

  • Full Time Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (27%), independent study (73%)
  • Full Time Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (25%), independent study (75%)
  • Full Time Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)
  • Sandwich Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (27%), independent study (73%)
  • Sandwich Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (25%), independent study (75%)
  • Sandwich Year 3 placement (100%)
  • Sandwich Year 4 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)

92% of BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology full-time students agree that they have been able to contact staff when they needed to. (National Student Survey 2017)

Careers and employability

Our Psychology with Criminology course is designed so that you can develop all the knowledge and skills that you'll need for your future career.

The course will develop your transferable skills, including:

  • numerical skills (including statistical analysis)
  • analytical skills and critical thinking
  • communication skills
  • presentation skills
  • problem-solving skills.

Highly sought after by employers, these skills will put you in a strong position within the graduate market.

Work experience opportunities

You'll get the opportunity to participate in our Professional Practice in Psychology module. This provides you with the opportunity to experience life as a consultant psychologist, to provide psychological solutions to real-world problem scenarios supplied by external organisations, and to present their solutions to these organisations.

You'll also be able to select the optional Work-Based Psychology Practice module. Students that choose this module will get to engage in work-related roles through volunteering, paid work, or workplace shadowing.

If you have applied for the four-year sandwich course (CM83), you will complete a year-long work placement.

We encourage all our students to take part in voluntary work. Nottingham Trent Volunteering will allow you to get involved in one-day challenges, student-led projects and the volunteer shop. You can also gain formal recognition for your achievements outside of your studies with our Acceler8 employability award. This award will improve your employability prospects and act as a record of the experiences you gain at NTU.

Our employability team

Careers and employability advice is available to all our undergraduate students, and is provided by a team of subject specialists within the Department of Psychology and the University's Employability team.

Psychology is very proud of its graduates and their successes, and we very much look forward to helping you graduate to your chosen career, be it in psychology or beyond.

Your career development

With the British Psychological Society’s GBC secured (providing you graduate with a 2.2 honours degree), you will be eligible on graduation to pursue further postgraduate (Masters or Doctoral) training in psychology, possibly as a professional psychologist (in forensic, clinical, educational, occupational, counselling or sport psychology), to pursue an academic and / or research career in various areas of psychology or criminology (by working as a research assistant, for example, or by studying for a Masters or PhD), or to pursue criminology-relevant careers in the probation, police or prison services.

Psychology qualifications tend to be very popular with all employers because they demand an ability to communicate effectively in both spoken and written forms (through verbal presentation and the writing of essays and reports), an ability to solve real-world problems, and well-developed numerical skills. This all means you will be well placed to capitalise on other graduate employment opportunities in areas as diverse as marketing, human resources, policing and teaching. Further study or training may be required for some of these roles.

The job titles below give an indication of the careers our recent Psychology with Criminology graduates are pursuing:*

  • Civil enforcement officer
  • Community protection officer
  • Conversation assistant
  • HR administrator
  • Mental healthcare assistant
  • Prison officer
  • PR assistant
  • Recruitment consultant
  • Research assistant
  • Teaching assistant
  • Special constable
  • Support worker
  • Youth worker.

*Latest DLHE survey undergraduate results, 2011-12 and 2014-15.

Over 95% of our Psychology graduates are employed or engaged in further study six months after leaving NTU. (DLHE 2015/16 Full-time and Sandwich, UK, First degree, undergraduate)

92% of BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology full-time students are satisfied with the learning resources available to them (National Student Survey 2017).

Entry requirements

For September 2018 entry, you will need the following.

Three years full-time

You will need one of the following:

  • A-levels – BBC; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DMM; or
  • 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

Four-year placement

You will need one of the following:

  • A-levels – BBB; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DDM; or
  • 120 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

Three-year and four-year route

It is preferable that students do not have more than one A-level in a performance, artistic or creative subject. However, all applications will be considered on an individual basis. Performance, artistic or creative subjects include the following:

  • Art and Design
  • Dance
  • Design and Technology – Food Technology
  • Design and Technology – Product Design
  • Design and Technology – Systems and Control
  • Drama
  • Theatre Studies
  • Fine Art
  • Graphic Design
  • Leisure Studies
  • Performance Studies
  • Performing Arts
  • Photography
  • Textiles
  • Three Dimensional Design or similar
  • Applied Art and Design
  • Applied Art and Design (Double Award)
  • Applied Leisure Studies
  • Applied Leisure Studies (Double Award).

Psychology is about understanding behaviour in all its forms. Primarily, you will have an interest in psychology (why people behave in the way they do) and a related interest in criminology (crime and crime prevention). Psychology at Nottingham Trent University is treated as both a biological and social science, and it is preferable that you have some understanding of the broad nature of the discipline. Ideally, you will be interested in learning about how to carry out research and analyse data.

All applications are considered on a case-by-case basis and we are happy to accept applications from mature students, students with access qualifications, and many other types of standard and non-standard qualifications for which we can calculate UCAS points. Non-standard applicants may be interviewed.

Please note that a Disclosure and Barring Service check (formerly known as a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure) will be necessary before working with young people or vulnerable populations, but it is not required for admission onto the BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology.

The UCAS Tariff

We’ve created this calculator to help you work out how many UCAS points your qualifications relate to.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions team or call +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Course transfers

Transfers between the full-time and sandwich courses may be possible when you have enrolled at NTU, but the transfer will be subject to places becoming available on the sandwich course. The transfer will also be subject to you meeting a transfer criteria which includes:

  • meeting the UCAS entry criteria for the course
  • passing your first year on the full-time course with a specific percentage average and no fail or compensated passes.

Please note that course transfers cannot be guaranteed.

We accept qualifications from schools, colleges and universities all over the world for entry onto our undergraduate degrees. If you’re not sure how your international qualification matches our course requirements please visit our international qualifications page.

For September 2018 entry you will need the following.

Three years full-time

You will need one of the following:

  • A-levels – BBC; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DMM; or
  • 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C.

Four-year placement

You will need one of the following:

  • A-levels – BBB; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DDM; or
  • 120 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

Three-year and four-year route

You will need GCSE English Language and Maths grade C or above.

It is preferable that students do not have more than one A-level in a performance, artistic or creative subject. However, all applications will be considered on an individual basis. Performance, artistic or creative subjects include the following:

  • Art and Design
  • Dance
  • Design and Technology – Food Technology
  • Design and Technology – Product Design
  • Design and Technology – Systems and Control
  • Drama
  • Theatre Studies
  • Fine Art
  • Graphic Design
  • Leisure Studies
  • Performance Studies
  • Performing Arts
  • Photography
  • Textiles
  • Three Dimensional Design or similar
  • Applied Art and Design
  • Applied Art and Design (Double Award)
  • Applied Leisure Studies
  • Applied Leisure Studies (Double Award).

Psychology is about understanding behaviour in all its forms. Primarily, you will have an interest in psychology (why people behave in the way they do) and a related interest in criminology (crime and crime prevention). Psychology at Nottingham Trent University is treated as both a biological and social science, and it is preferable that you have some understanding of the broad nature of the discipline. Ideally, you will be interested in learning about how to carry out research and analyse data.

All applications are considered on a case-by-case basis and we are happy to accept applications from mature students, students with access qualifications, and many other types of standard and non-standard qualifications for which we can calculate UCAS points. Non-standard applicants may be interviewed.

Please note that a Disclosure and Barring Service check (formerly known as a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure) will be necessary before working with young people or vulnerable populations, but it is not required for admission onto the BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology.

Foundation courses
If you need to do a foundation course to meet our course requirements, please visit Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC). If you’re already studying in the UK at a school or college and would like to know if we can accept your qualification, please visit our foundation courses page.

English language entry requirements
If English is not your first language, you need to show us that your language skills are strong enough for intensive academic study. We usually ask for an IELTS test and we accept some alternative English language tests.

For a list of our language requirements please visit our English language page.

If you need to do a pre-sessional English language course to meet the English requirements, please visit our pre-sessional English course page.

Help and support
If you have any questions about your qualifications, or about making an application to the University, please contact our International team for advice.

University preparation courses
If you do not meet the entry requirements, you may be interested in our pre-Masters or Foundation course at Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), which leads onto this postgraduate or undergraduate degree if successfully completed. NTIC students are based on the City Campus, and have access to all the University facilities.

Find out more about university preparation courses at NTIC.

Course transfers

Transfers between the full-time and sandwich courses may be possible when you have enrolled at NTU, but the transfer will be subject to places becoming available on the sandwich course. The transfer will also be subject to you meeting a transfer criteria which includes:

  • meeting the UCAS entry criteria for the course
  • passing your first year on the full-time course with a specific percentage average and no fail or compensated passes.

Please note that course transfers cannot be guaranteed.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can. Just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow the instructions for applying. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement
Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember that we can only make a decision based on what you tell us, so include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application – it’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place. You’ve got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up to date
After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

You can apply directly to NTU for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year. If you are applying to more than one UK university, you must apply through UCAS.


Apply as early as you can so that you have time to prepare for your studies. If you need a visa to study here, you need to plan this into your application.

Apply now

Keeping up to date
After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Good luck with your application.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Further information on how to apply

Need help with your application?
For admissions related enquiries please contact us:
Telephone: +44 (0)115 848 4200

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

International fees and scholarships
For international and EU fees for all courses, together with advice on how to pay, please visit our international fees information.

We offer prestigious scholarships to our international students holding offers to study here. For details and an application form, please visit our international scholarships information.

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

Still need help?

School of Social Sciences Enquiries
+44 (0)115 848 4460