BSc (Hons)

Psychology with Counselling

Female psychology students
Top
10
In the UK for Psychology
in The Guardian University Guide 2020
  • UCAS code(s): C808 / C809
  • Level(s) of study: Undergraduate
  • Study mode(s): Full-time
  • Location: City Campus
  • Starting: September 2020
  • Course duration: Four years placement / Three years full-time

*This course is currently undergoing accreditation by the British Psychological Society (BPS). Please continue to check this course web page for the latest developments.

This exciting new course provides the opportunity to study the fascinating world of psychology in combination with counselling. The course is ideal for those who want to acquire a breadth of experience and knowledge in psychology, whilst following a specialised and distinctive programme in the ever-evolving field of counselling.

Degree Options:

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling C808
BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling (Sandwich) C809 – This is a four-year course, including a work placement year.

Why choose this course?

Teaching and research excellence

By joining a psychology course at NTU you’ll be part of a research active community.

  • You’ll design and carry out your own research in your final year and you may have the opportunity to compete for paid work as a research assistant between Year Two and Three.
  • 60% of our research outputs were considered to be internationally excellent or world leading in REF 2014 and 100% of our research impact is internationally excellent with 73% described as world leading.
  • We’re a top 10 University for Psychology in the Guardian University Guide 2019.

Professional skills and recognition

  • You can gain practical experience between Years Two and Three as well as undertake a work placement or study abroad at one of our partner institutions.
  • You also have the option of choosing to complete a four year course which includes a year-long work placement.
  • In Year Two you will get the opportunity to gain work related experience through our Personal and Professional Development module. Offering you the chance to appreciate the importance of employment related experience and skills.

A personalised experience

The degree caters for both students who wish to become professional psychologists and those who wish to pursue a career in counselling or related professions.

You will have the chance to tailor-make your studies by choosing options from a unique range of modules in your final year.

Expert staff and specialist facilities

  • Study in one of the largest psychology departments in the UK. You will be taught and supervised by over 80 expert psychologists who have a diverse range of interests and research areas.
  • You'll be able to take full advantage of our excellent teaching laboratory suite. The facilities and equipment are exclusively for our psychology students, and will help you carry out your own research and data analysis.

What you'll study

*We are currently reviewing the content of our courses to ensure that they remain relevant and current to out students’ future ambitions and society. Please continue to check this course webpage for the latest developments.

In the first two years of your degree, you'll complete an introduction to psychology and counselling with core modules in biological, social, developmental and cognitive psychology, counselling techniques and tools, and you'll undertake training in research methods and statistics.

In your final year, you'll sit a further core module in psychology and counselling, and can select specialist final year modules linked to the areas of staff research expertise within Psychology. In your final year you'll also complete a research project in psychology, focused on a topic of your choosing under the supervision of a research-active member of staff.

Four-year placement course

You also have the option of choosing to complete a four-year course that includes a year-long work placement in between Year Two and Year Three. You must apply with the UCAS code C809 to be considered for the four-year sandwich or placement course.

Study abroad

If you are on the three-year full-time course, you may also have the chance to study abroad at one of our partner universities. You'll decide early on in your first year if you would like to apply to take part in the exchange programme. You would study abroad between Year Two and Year Three, and it would therefore involve extending the course length to four years. The study abroad option is only available for students on the three-year full-time route, and therefore you must apply with the UCAS code C808

  • Year One

    Core modules

    Introduction to Psychology

    You will examine how psychology research is conducted and interpreted; a range of perspectives in psychology, including comparative psychology; psychopathology and cognition; key studies and theories in psychology; and current developments in psychology. You will study in detail historically important approaches to psychology. There is also a practical focus on the levels of analysis at which psychologists work, and the relationship between psychological theories and everyday human behaviour and experience.

    Research Methods in Psychology

    An introduction to a variety of research methods used in psychology. You have the opportunity to develop and practice report-writing skills, understand experimentation and self-report methods, and gain practical experience. You will run and report upon your study in groups. You will be required to formulate hypotheses, search for and review any relevant literature in the library, prepare necessary materials or instruments, select a sample, collect and analyse data using appropriate statistical techniques, interpret the findings, and produce an individual written report of the work undertaken.

    Research Methods (one)

    An introduction to a variety of research methods used in psychology. You have the opportunity to develop and practice report-writing skills, understand experimentation and self-report methods, and gain practical experience. You will run and report upon your study in groups. You will be required to formulate hypotheses, search for and review any relevant literature in the library, prepare necessary materials or instruments, select a sample, collect and analyse data using appropriate statistical techniques, interpret the findings, and produce an individual written report of the work undertaken.

    Statistics (one)

    Study the fundamental concepts and practices of statistical data analysis in psychology. By the end of the module, you should be able to design research studies in psychology, and be familiar with a range of descriptive, nonparametric, and parametric statistics. The module is assessed by one examination at the end of the module. Continuous feedback throughout the year will help you progress, help you develop your skills, and act as resource to draw upon when conducting research.

    Approaches to Counselling

    This module will introduce you to the major theoretical models in counselling (cognitive-behavioural, person-centred, psychodynamic) as well as the importance of integrative approaches in the counselling and psychotherapeutic professions.

    Counselling Toolbox

    You will develop basic counselling skills and how to apply these through experiential exercises, such as working in triads (as counsellor, client and observer).

  • Year Two

    Core modules

    Cognitive and Biological Psychology

    Study the cognitive and biological perspective of psychology, encountering concepts and research methodologies in topics such as memory, attention, sensation, and perception. You will be introduced to the structure and function of the brain and allied structures; the language of biological psychology; the main approaches taken in behavioural neuroscience, such as functional neuroanatomy and functional neurophysiology; a range of biological, evolutionary and genetic influences that affect human behaviour and experience; basic cognitive processes; and the relationship between cognitive approaches and other approaches in psychology. You will also consider the applications of cognitive psychology in accounting for everyday processes and in improving human performance.

    Social and Lifespan Developmental Psychology

    Examine social and lifespan developmental aspects of psychology, including: the major theories and methodological approaches in social and developmental psychology; the range of development across a person’s lifespan; the diversity of development of individuals and groups across age, time, culture and place; and the relationship between theories in social psychology and an everyday understanding of social behaviour.

    Research Methods and Statistics

    An integrated module studying advanced experimental, psychometric, and qualitative research techniques in laboratory practicals. Supporting this are a series of lectures and workshops designed to help you develop your statistical knowledge and skills. Laboratory work will involve one experimental study, one regression-based study, and a qualitative study. All studies will be on an area relevant to psychology. You will be organised into small groups, and each group will have to run and report upon their study. You will also be required to formulate hypotheses, search for and review relevant literature, prepare or select necessary stimuli or scales, select a sample, collect and analyse data appropriately, interpret findings, and produce individual reports of the work undertaken. The module will also build upon the content of Statistics (One). Particular emphasis will be placed on factorial ANOVA and the concept of interaction. You will also consider the theory and statistical techniques associated primarily with non-experimental research. These include multiple regression, Cronbach’s alpha, multiple correlations, and exploratory factor analysis.

    Critical Thinking in Counselling

    Consider some of the key debates in contemporary psychology and counselling and discuss how they inform current research and practice.

    Personal and Professional Development

    This module will provide activities focusing on your personal and professional development and will include a work-integrated learning experience.

  • Final year

    Core modules

    Client Issues in Counselling

    Evaluate how theory and research applies to the complex range of issues that clients may bring to counselling and consider how issues of difference (such as ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability) may affect the counselling process.

    Psychology Research Project

    A major piece of work whereby you will carry out independent research, the topic and design of which is decided upon in consultation with a supervisor. The project will demonstrate that you can conduct an extended research report, as well as an understanding of the methodological skills and presentational techniques developed throughout the course.

    Advanced Psychology

    Choose between the following:

    Students select a module in either Advanced Social and Developmental Psychology or Advanced Cognitive and Biological Psychology. These modules involve exploring these core areas of psychology in more depth and will develop your critical analysis skills on these areas.

    • Advanced Cognitive and Biological Psychology
      This advanced psychology module aims to give students further insight into biological and cognitive material, building on the basic knowledge acquired in Year Two. In particular you will be encourage to develop a reflective understating of the anatomy and physiological processes that underpin psychological experience, develop an understand of the methodologies used to examine issues in biological psychology, critically examine how contemporary bio-psychological models are developed and evaluate them as explanations of behaviour, develop a thorough understanding of how various cognitive psychological constructs can be used to theorise mental functioning in a range of domains, and develop an in-depth understanding of the cognitive processes that underlie the performance of several different everyday tasks and have an understanding of relevant research evidence, and of how research relates to theory, to be able to critically evaluate different accounts of cognitive functioning in specific domains.
    • Advanced Social and Developmental Psychology
      This module will build on the Year Two Social and Lifespan Developmental Psychology module. You will further explore child development and its relationship to a child’s genetics and environment, childhood, education and family, attachment and emotional development, adolescence, Language development, cognitive processing and development, difficulties in children’s development, social categorisation, social identity, Pro-social behaviour, processes of social influence and intergroup relations. You will also develop knowledge and understanding of social psychological processes, be able to contextualise the development and use of social and developmental psychological theory and research and build on your understanding of how evidence from investigations can inform theory and practice, provide in-depth discussions of a set of contemporary applied issues in social and developmental psychology, evaluate the relevance of theory and research in social and developmental psychology to specific areas of application and become a critical reader of the research literature.

    Optional modules

    Choose two modules from Set B and Set C.

    Set B

    Biological Perspectives on Psychiatric Disorders

    This module examines biological accounts of psychiatric disorders, concentrating particularly on how biology links to cognitive deficits that are symptomatic of a disorder.

    Community, Health and Applied Social Psychology

    This module aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of how to apply social psychological theory and research to marginalised and / or disempowered communities and ‘real world’ social issues. You will be prompted to use a community psychology approach to understanding health and well-being so that they do not solely focus on the individual or on society in general, but will seek to understand the relationship between the two. Students will be equipped with the skills to work with  individuals, cohesive community groups, and marginalised / disempowered sections within society and will work together to explore methods of how to promote health and well-being within these groups. Topics covered may include: social determinants of health; tackling health inequalities; stress, coping and mental health; social identity and mental health recovery; identity development over the life-span; dealing with prejudice and cultivating an inclusive approach to addressing social problems.

    Evolutionary Psychology

    Evolutionary psychology examines to what extent human behaviour can be explained by our evolutionary past and covers topics ranging from cooperation, cheating, comparative psychology and the evolution of the social brain.

    Infant Development

    Explore the psychological aspects of infant development with a focus on exploring a holistic approach to understanding an infant’s cognitive, emotional, social, and neural development.

    Psychology, Educational Needs and Inclusion

    Develop your own specialist understanding of a particular area of educational support needs, while encouraging critical reflection on the role that psychology can and does play in that particular area.

    Statistics (three): Advanced Statistics for Research

    Study advanced methods of statistical data analysis the kind necessary to study complex real-world data set. You will be introduced to sophisticated methods of statistical computing and deal with real world data.

    Psychology of the Paranormal

    The aim of this module is to introduce and provide a background to a variety of existential experiences, variously termed 'psychical’, 'spiritual', ‘paranormal’, 'anomalous', or ‘exceptional’ experiences, or 'aberrant perceptions or beliefs' by the research and health professionals active in this field. You will define the experiences and explore the psychological models and methods that have been postulated to explain them, critically appraise the various approaches and perspectives as applied to a core set of contemporary topics that distinguish this field of work.

    Psychology of the Family

    The aim of this module is to explore the psychology of the family, including their composition and context. The module will consider the various ways in which psychologists study families, including a critical evaluation of the methods used. The module curriculum will take a student-led approach, using your previous knowledge and understanding to design the content within the parameters set by the teaching team. This approach will encourage you, as a group, to be responsible and directive about your own learning. The focus of this module is on the family as a unit, it is not a developmental psychology module.

    Person Perception

    Human faces, voices and bodies are information rich, biologically and socially significant objects. The primary aim of this module is to explore how we detect, process and perceive them, or how we fail to do so. The module will consider how we represent and process human faces, voices and bodies on their own and together, drawing on real world (e.g. CCTV, Passport control) and laboratory based research and applications. The module will draw on elements of cognitive and biological psychology, social and developmental psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary psychology.

    The Psychology of Sleep

    This modules seeks to provide a comprehensive treatment of sleep, from its underpinning physiological science to the practice of how sleep might be improved. You'll gain a critical and practical understanding of key issues in the psychology of sleep through: providing a comprehensive exploration of the phenomenon of sleep. Developing students understanding of the major areas and issues in the field, with a specific focus on the biological basis of sleep, effects of sleep loss, susceptibility to the effects of sleep loss, sleep problems and disorders and their amelioration. Providing students with the opportunity to see how sleep knowledge can be critically integrated into other areas of psychological expertise. Along with the chance to understand your own sleep better.

    The Psychology of Ageing and Neurodegenerative Disease

    The module will focus on the challenges faced by individuals and society as a result of healthy ageing and as a result of neurodegenerative diseases (with an emphasis on age-related disease such as dementia and Parkinson’s disease).The module covers degeneration-based changes in individuals from a cognitive and social perspective. These include: Healthy Ageing, Dementia and the impact of other neurodegenerative diseases not directly associated to ageing on cognitive function and social functioning.

    Black and Cultural Psychology

    TBC

    Set C

    Language and Literacy Development in Children

    Explore the cognitive basis of children's early language and literacy skills, and debates the causes of developmental language disorders.

    Clinical Neuropsychology

    The aim of the module is to equip you with techniques for developing and performing neuropsychological assessments. Lectures will cover topics in traumatic brain injury, neuroscience (including neuroimaging) of specific cognitive functions, and diagnostic assessments. During workshops, you will engage in role-play performance of neuropsychological assessments and diagnostic interviews using standardized batteries, such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. You will become familiar with a range of neuropsychological tests used to measure cognitive abilities, and will devise a neuropsychological assessment to test a specific brain abnormality. You will also critically evaluate neuropsychological assessment of brain abnormality as it applies to the understanding of normal brain and cognitive functioning.

    Psychology of Trauma

    Examine a range of psychopathology and trauma related issues such as the origins and history of psychotic illness, psychopharmacology and psychosocial therapy, childhood trauma and psychosis, as well as outcomes of trauma, namely dissociation, substance use and deliberate self-harm.

    Addictive Behaviours

    The module examines a range of issues associated with addictive behaviours. The lectures will identify issues with definitions of addictive behaviour and the critical evaluation of different types of addiction (i.e. in depth examination of alcoholism, drug addictions, pathological gambling, video game addiction, internet addiction, exercise addiction, sex addiction and paraphilias). This will provide a basis for you to develop a critical understanding of the identification and treatment of addictive behaviours. Topics covered may include: problems of definition of addiction; commonalities and models of addiction; theories of addiction; conceptual crises in the field of addictive behaviour; addictive personality; types of addiction; treatments of addictive behaviour.

    Psychopathology and Offending Behaviour

    Understand how personality disorders, brain injuries, intellectual disabilities, substance misuse and major mental illnesses influence behaviour and how these conditions are associated with criminal offending.

    Social Development in Children and Adolescents

    The module aims to enable you to develop a detailed and critical understanding of children’s and adolescents’ development in the social world. In particular, through focusing on current research and theories, the module will examine the role of peers, the family, and the outside influences on children’s and adolescents’ social development. You will be encouraged to critically evaluate the short-term and long-term consequences of social relationships during childhood and adolescence. Topics covered may include: attachment; child care and upbringing (e.g., the family, parenting and siblings); the importance of peer relationships: peer acceptance and peer rejection; the role of friendships; social withdrawal and shyness; bullying and peer victimisation; and school adjustment.

    The Psychology of Sex Offending

    The module will develop your knowledge of the psychology of sexual offending, including the investigation, risk assessment, and treatment of sexual offenders, and theories that underpin and help to explain sexual crime. Different sexual crimes will be examined, and the profile of offenders examined. Following an introduction to the area of sexual offending and the work of forensic psychologists with the perpetrators of sexual crime, you will learn about the theories underpinning sexual offending, the risk assessments, management and interventions available for sexual offenders. The module will also consider important issues for forensic psychologists in the pre and post-conviction setting such as denial, social exclusion and cognitive distortions of offenders.

    The Science of False Memory

    Individuals often claim to remember events and details of events that in fact never occurred. These memories, known as false memories, are ubiquitous but usually harmless consequences of memory processes. False memories, however, can have very serious ramifications. In this module you'll explore and critically evaluate applied question such as “what are the consequences of a witness claiming to remember details of a perpetrator that are in fact untrue?” and “can false memories be ‘accidentally’ generated during psychotherapy?”. This module will build upon previous knowledge of cognitive psychology and explore the philosophical and psychological theories of how and why false memories are formed, examine the applied consequences of these memory errors and investigate ways false memories can be identified and prevented.

    Please note:

    The number of places available on some optional modules may be limited. These will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Students who are unable to select their first choice will be offered an alternative from the remaining optional modules.

Course specification

View the full course specification
Please note that course specifications may be subject to change

We’re a top 10 University for psychology in the Guardian University Guide 2019.

How you’re taught

The BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling is taught by experienced staff used to working with students from a range of backgrounds and with varying levels of skill and experience.

To provide you with a first-class learning experience and to guarantee you have an opportunity to make the most of your time at university, you will receive contact time through a diverse range of delivery methods that include lectures, workshops, and one-on-one supervision. The smaller group sessions provide opportunities to develop:

  • problem-solving skills
  • group working skills
  • analytical skills
  • debating skills
  • presentation skills
  • research and data analysis skills.

Tutorials with staff

Students are supported throughout the course via a tutorial system. These small group meetings allow the students contact with an individual member of staff, who will help them with study skills and advice about the course and curriculum. At these sessions you will also have the opportunity to:

  • discuss and gain feedback about your work
  • ask questions about the projects you're working on
  • raise any difficulties you are experiencing relating to your work, personal circumstances, or your university experience.

Independent study

Independent study is an important part of this course. Throughout the three years of your course, you will develop the skills required to undertake an independent research study in the form of a final year research project. Our final year students conduct research projects in a wide range of areas in psychology, some of which have been successfully published.

Virtual learning environment

You'll also use our virtual learning environment NOW, which is a flexible web-based system that allows you to have 24-hour access to module learning materials and reading lists. It allows you to discuss work with tutors and other students, and submit coursework electronically from anywhere in the world.

Learning from experts

Our lecturers are highly respected researchers who conduct innovative research in their specialist areas. Research groups include:

  • Addiction and Aberrant Behaviours
  • Wellbeing
  • Development, Interaction and Social Relations
  • Language and Psycholinguistics
  • Cognition

There are also a range of research units including:

  • The International Gaming Research Unit
  • Emergency Services Research Unit
  • Specific Language Impairment Research Unit
  • Sexual Offences, Crime and Misconduct Research Unit

In addition to the traditional lectures, tutorials and independent study, you will also hear and learn from renowned experts and professionals in related fields who are regularly invited to come and talk to our students, providing you with an insight into their specialist knowledge and experiences.

You'll get the opportunity to attend the Department of Psychology seminar series that takes place throughout the academic year. The seminars invite experts and professional to present their publications and research findings. This is an integral part of the research culture in the Psychology Department and stimulates thinking and debate.

Study abroad opportunities

If you are on the three-year full-time course, you may also have the chance to study abroad at one of our partner universities. You'll decide early on in your first year if you would like to apply to take part in the exchange programme. You would study abroad between Year Two and Year Three, and it would therefore involve extending the course length to four years.

The study abroad option is only available for students on the three-year full-time route, and therefore you must apply with the UCAS code XXXX.

All of our exchange partners offer modules taught in English, including our European partners, so foreign language skills are not essential.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study, you also have the opportunity to learn a new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students, and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have.

Learning a new language can:

  • enhance your communication skills
  • enrich your experience when travelling abroad
  • boost your career prospects.

Find out more about the University Language Programme.

How will I be assessed?

You'll be assessed in a variety of ways and on a modular basis – through traditional means such as examinations and essays, but also in more innovative ways such as research reports, oral and poster presentations, and by a final year research project. Our diverse approach to assessment allows students to demonstrate the breadth of their abilities and provides opportunity for everyone to excel.

The range of assessment tools has been acknowledged as one of the strengths of the course by the BPS Accreditation Committee and External Examiners.

In response to student feedback, the University has introduced a policy ensuring marked work is returned to you electronically within three weeks of submission.

Assessment methods

Full time version of the course (3 years)

  • Year 1 coursework (48%), written (50%) and practical (2%)
  • Year 2 coursework (75%), written (25%)
  • Year 3 coursework (58%), written (17%) and practical (25%)

Sandwich / study abroad version of the course (4 Years)

  • Year 1 coursework (48%), written (50%) and practical (2%)
  • Year 2 coursework (75%), written (25%)
  • Year 3 placement / study abroad
  • Year 4 coursework (59%), written (33%) and practical (8%)

Contact hours

A full-time student on average can expect to spend 1200 hours a year learning which will typically be broken down as follows:

Full time version of the course (3 years)

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)
  • Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (22%), independent study (78%)

Sandwich / study abroad version of the course (4 Years)

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)
  • Year 3 Placement (100%)
  • Year 4 lectures/seminars/workshops (22%), independent study (78%)

Careers and employability

Our BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling course is designed to help you develop all the knowledge and skills that you'll need for your future career. The course will develop your transferable skills, including:

  • numerical skills (including statistical analysis)
  • analytical skills and critical thinking
  • communication skills
  • presentation skills
  • problem-solving skills.

Highly sought after by employers, these skills will put you in a strong position in the graduate market.

Excellent work experience opportunities

You'll get the opportunity to participate in our Personal and Professional Development module. This module encompasses personal reflective exercises to help you develop self-awareness and group activities to enable you to appreciate the importance of the way groups might work within a professional setting. You will also have the opportunity to gain further experience and skills relevant to employability with a work-based practice element.

If you have applied for the four-year sandwich course, you will complete a year-long work placement.

We encourage all our students to take part in voluntary work. Nottingham Trent Volunteering will allow you to get involved in one-day challenges, student-led projects, and the volunteer shop. You can also gain formal recognition for your achievements outside of your studies with our Acceler8 employability award. This award will improve your employability prospects and act as a record of the experiences you gain at NTU.

Your career development

With the British Psychological Society’s GBC secured (provided you graduate with a 2.2 honours degree), you will be eligible on graduation to pursue further postgraduate (Masters of Doctoral) training in psychology, possibly as a professional psychologist (in forensic, clinical, educational, occupational, counselling, and sport psychology), to pursue an academic and / or research career in various areas of psychology (by working as a research assistant, for example, or by studying for a Masters or PhD), or simply to exploit the transferable skills you have learned on your course to pursue a career outside of psychology.

Psychology qualifications tend to be very popular with all employers because they demand an ability to communicate effectively in both spoken and written forms (through verbal presentation and the writing of essays and reports), an ability to solve real-world problems, and well-developed numerical skills. This all means you will be well placed to capitalise on other graduate employment opportunities in areas as diverse as marketing, human resources, policing and teaching. Further study or training may be required for some of these roles.

Our Employability team

Careers and employability advice is available to all our undergraduate students and is provided by a team of subject specialists within the Department of Psychology and the University's Employability team.

Psychology is very proud of its graduates and their successes. We very much look forward to helping you graduate to your chosen career, be it in psychology or beyond.

Entry requirements

For September 2020 entry you will need:

Three years full-time

  • A-levels – ABB; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DDM; or
  • 128 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

Four-year placement

  • A-levels – AAB; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DDD; or
  • 136 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

Three-year and four-year routes

It is preferable that students do not have more than one A-level in a performance, artistic or creative subject. However, all applications will be considered on an individual basis. Performance, artistic or creative subjects include the following:

  • Art and Design
  • Dance
  • Design and Technology – Food Technology
  • Design and Technology – Product Design
  • Design and Technology – Systems and Control
  • Drama
  • Theatre Studies
  • Fine Art
  • Graphic Design
  • Leisure Studies
  • Performance Studies
  • Performing Arts
  • Photography
  • Textiles
  • Three Dimensional Design or similar
  • Applied Art and Design
  • Applied Art and Design (Double Award)
  • Applied Leisure Studies
  • Applied Leisure Studies (Double Award

Psychology is about understanding behaviour, in all its forms. Primarily you will have an interest in psychology – in why people behave in the way they do. Psychology at Nottingham Trent University is treated as both a biological and social science, and it is preferable that you have some understanding of the broad nature of the discipline. Ideally, you will be interested in learning about out how to carry out research and analyse data.

All applications are considered on a case-by-case basis and we are happy to accept applications from mature students, students with access qualifications, and many other types of standard and non-standard qualifications for which we can calculate UCAS points. Non-standard applicants may be interviewed.

Please note that a Disclosure and Barring Service check (formerly known as a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure) will be necessary before working with young people or vulnerable populations, but it is not required for admission onto the BSc (Hons) Psychology or the course pathways.

The UCAS Tariff

We’ve created this calculator to help you work out how many UCAS points your qualifications relate to.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions team or call +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Course transfers

Transfers between the full-time and sandwich courses may be possible when you have enrolled at NTU, but the transfer will be subject to places becoming available on the sandwich course. The transfer will also be subject to you meeting criteria which include:

  • meeting the UCAS entry criteria for the course
  • passing your first year on the full-time course with a specific percentage average, with no fail or compensated passes.

Please note that course transfers cannot be guaranteed.

We accept qualifications from schools, colleges and universities all over the world for entry onto our undergraduate degrees. If you’re not sure how your international qualification matches our course requirements please visit our international qualifications page.

For September 2020 entry you will need:

Three years full-time

  • A-levels – ABB; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DDM; or
  • 128 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

Four-year placement

  • A-levels – AAB; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DDD; or
  • 136 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

Three-year and four-year routes

It is preferable that students do not have more than one A-level in a performance, artistic or creative subject. However, all applications will be considered on an individual basis. Performance, artistic or creative subjects include the following:

  • Art and Design
  • Dance
  • Design and Technology – Food Technology
  • Design and Technology – Product Design
  • Design and Technology – Systems and Control
  • Drama
  • Theatre Studies
  • Fine Art
  • Graphic Design
  • Leisure Studies
  • Performance Studies
  • Performing Arts
  • Photography
  • Textiles
  • Three Dimensional Design or similar
  • Applied Art and Design
  • Applied Art and Design (Double Award)
  • Applied Leisure Studies
  • Applied Leisure Studies (Double Award).

Psychology is about understanding behaviour, in all its forms. Primarily you will have an interest in psychology – in why people behave in the way they do. Psychology at Nottingham Trent University is treated as both a biological and social science, and it is preferable that you have some understanding of the broad nature of the discipline. Ideally, you will be interested in learning about out how to carry out research and analyse data.

Please note that a Disclosure and Barring Service check (formerly known as a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure) will be necessary before working with young people or vulnerable populations, but it is not required for admission onto the BSc (Hons) Psychology or the course pathways.

Foundation courses

If you need to do a foundation course to meet our course requirements, please visit Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC). If you’re already studying in the UK at a school or college and would like to know if we can accept your qualification, please visit our foundation courses page.

English language entry requirements

If English is not your first language, you need to show us that your language skills are strong enough for intensive academic study. We usually ask for an IELTS test and we accept some alternative English language tests.

For a list of our language requirements, please visit our English language page.

If you need to do a pre-sessional English language course to meet the English requirements, please visit our pre-sessional English course page.

Help and support

If you have any questions about your qualifications or about making an application to the University, please contact our international team for advice.

University preparation courses

If you do not meet the entry requirements, you may be interested in our pre-Masters or Foundation course at Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), which leads onto this postgraduate or undergraduate degree if successfully completed. NTIC students are based on the City Campus and have access to all the University facilities.

Find out more about university preparation courses at NTIC.

Course transfers

Transfers between the full-time and sandwich courses may be possible when you have enrolled at NTU, but the transfer will be subject to places becoming available on the sandwich course. The transfer will also be subject to you meeting criteria which include:

  • meeting the UCAS entry criteria for the course
  • passing your first year on the full-time course with a specific percentage average, with no fail or compensated passes.

Please note that course transfers cannot be guaranteed.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can. Just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow the instructions for applying. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember that we can only make a decision based on what you tell us, so include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You’ve got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

You can apply directly to NTU for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year. If you are applying to more than one UK university, you must apply through UCAS.

Apply as early as you can so that you have time to prepare for your studies. If you need a visa to study here, you need to plan this into your application.

Apply now

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Good luck with your application!

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Fees and funding

Home / EU 
students
BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling£9,250

For students going out on placement, there is a fee of £1,385.

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

International fees and scholarships

International
students
BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling£13,900

For students going out on placement, there is a fee of £1,385.

For international and EU fees for all courses, together with advice on how to pay, please visit our international fees information.

We offer prestigious scholarships to our international students holding offers to study here. For details and an application form, please visit our international scholarships information.

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

Still need help?

School of Social Sciences Enquiries
+44 (0)115 848 4460