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Esther Kettel

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Role

Esther is a Lecturer in Ecology and Conservation in the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences. She is module leader for Skills for Scientists (L4), Wildlife Management (L6), Introduction to Ecological Consultancy (L6) and Protected Species Surveying (L7). Esther also contributes to teaching on a range of other modules related to ecology and conservation. She supervises a range of undergraduate and postgraduate research projects in ecology and wildlife conservation and is industry placement co-ordinator for BSc Wildlife Conservation and BSc Ecology and Conservation.

Esther is an active researcher, with interests in UK avian and mammalian ecology and conservation. She is particularly interested in assessing the impact of changing landscapes on population trends and human-wildlife conflicts.

Career overview

Esther gained a first class honours in Wildlife Conservation from Nottingham Trent University, an MRes in Conservation Biology from the University of Nottingham and a PhD in Ecology from Nottingham Trent University.

Before joining NTU as a lecturer in 2019, Esther worked as a Research Ecologist with the British Trust for Ornithology. She worked on a range of projects related to bird population trends. Esther has also worked with the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust and People's Trust for Endangered Species, conducting riparian mammal research across Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. Esther has also worked as a freelance ecological consultant, carrying out bird, bat, amphibian and reptile surveys.

Research areas

Esther has broad research interests related to the ecology and conservation of birds and mammals (mainly) in the UK. She has led and/or been involved in the following research areas:

- Impacts of urbanisation on raptors

- Human-wildlife conflict (particularly raptors)

- Effectiveness of conservation measures in relation to climate change

- Breeding performance of birds (including house martin, house sparrow, peregrine falcon)

- Monitoring techniques for small mammals

Publications

Kettel, E.F., Woodward, I., Balmer, D. and Noble, D. (under review) Using citizen science to assess drivers of house martin breeding performance. Ibis

Kettel, E.F., Gentle, L.K., Yarnell, R.W. and Quinn, J. (2019) Breeding performance of an apex predator, the peregrine falcon, across urban and rural landscapes, Urban Ecosystems 22 (1): 117 - 125.

Kettel, E.F., Gentle, L.K., Quinn, J. and Yarnell, R.W (2018) The reproductive success of raptors in urban landscapes: a review and meta-analysis, Journal of Ornithology 159 (1): 1 – 18.

Kettel, E.F., Gentle, L.K. and Yarnell, R.W (2016) Evidence of an urban peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) feeding young at night, Journal of Raptor Research 50 (3): 321 – 323.

Kettel, E.F., Perrow, M. R. and Reader, T. (2016) Live-trapping in the stalk zone of tall grasses as an effective way of monitoring harvest mice (Micromys minutus), European Journal of Wildlife Research 62 (2): 241 – 245.