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Michael Johnson

Michael Johnson

Principal Lecturer

School of Science & Technology

Staff Group(s)
Sport

Role

Dr Johnson is a Principal Lecturer in exercise physiology and teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level. He is the Postgraduate Courses Manager for the MRes Sport Science courses and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Dr Johnson completed his PhD at Nottingham Trent University and his research activity is focused on respiratory and exercise physiology, specifically responses and limitations of the pulmonary system during exercise, mechanisms of dyspnoea/breathlessness, the aetiology of exercise intolerance, and exercise-induced asthma.

Research areas

Dr Johnson is a member of the Exercise & Health Research Group in the Sport, Health & Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre. His research is primarily focused on respiratory and exercise physiology, specifically responses and limitations of the pulmonary system during exercise, mechanisms of dyspnoea/breathlessness, the aetiology of exercise intolerance, and exercise-induced asthma.

Dr Johnson has authored many peer-reviewed journal articles in these research areas and has presented his research at numerous internationally-renowned scientific conferences. He is a member of the European Respiratory Society and peer reviewer for numerous scientific journals.

Opportunities to carry out postgraduate research towards an MPhil/PhD exist and further information may be obtained from the NTU Graduate School.

External activity

  • Member of the European Respiratory Society
  • Peer reviewer for numerous scientific journals
  • Dissemination of research at numerous internationally-renowned scientific conferences

Sponsors and collaborators

Current and recent research is being conducted with the collaboration, funding and/or support of:

  • Dr Dean Mills, University of Southern Queensland
  • Dr Andrew Prayle, University of Nottingham, Nottingham
  • Dr Dominick Shaw, City Hospital, Nottingham
  • Food Microbial Sciences Research Group, University of Reading
  • Clasado Ltd.

Publications

Selected publications

    • Walters S, Hoffman B, MacAskill W, Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Mills DE (2021). The control of respiratory pressures and neuromuscular activation to increase force production in trained martial arts practitioners. European Journal of Applied Physiology. In Press.
    • MacAskill W, Hoffman B, Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Mills DE (2021). Pressure measurement characteristics of a micro-transducer and balloon catheters. Physiological Reports, 9, e14831.
    • Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Needham RS, Williams NC (2021). Effects of prior voluntary hyperventilation on the 3-min all-out cycling test in men. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 53, 1482-1494.
    • Briskey DR, Vogel K, Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Coombes JS, Mills DE (2020). Inspiratory flow resistive breathing, respiratory muscle induced systemic oxidative stress and diaphragm fatigue in healthy humans. Journal of Applied Physiology, 129, 185-193.
    • Johnson MA, Williams NC, Graham AW, Ingram LAL, Cooper SB, Sharpe GR (2020). Effects of prior upper body exercise on the 3-min all-out cycling test in endurance trained men. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 52, 2402-2411.
    • Hamadeh L, Imran S, Bencsik M, Sharpe GR, Johnson MA, Fairhurst DJ (2020). Machine learning analysis for quantitative discrimination of dried blood droplets. Scientific Reports, 10, 3313.
    • Williams NC, Hunter KA, Shaw DE, Jackson KG, Sharpe GR, Johnson MA (2017). Comparable reductions in hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation after supplementation with 6.2 and 3.1 g/d of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in adults with asthma. British Journal of Nutrition, 117, 1379-1389
    • Williams NC, Johnson MA, Shaw DE, Spendlove I, Vulevic J, Sharpe GR, Hunter KA (2016). A prebiotic galactooligosaccharide mixture reduces severity of hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation. British Journal of Nutrition, 116, 798-804
    • Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Williams NC, Hannah R (2015). Locomotor muscle fatigue is not critically regulated after prior upper body exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 119, 840-850
    • Williams NC, Johnson MA, Hunter KA, Sharpe GR (2015). Reproducibility of the bronchoconstrictive response to eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea. Respiratory Medicine, 109, 1262-1267
    • Mills DE, Johnson MA, Barnett YA, Smith WHT, Sharpe GR (2015). The effects of inspiratory muscle training in older adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47, 691-697
    • Johnson MA, Gregson IR, Mills DE, Gonzalez JT, Sharpe GR (2014). Inspiratory muscle warm-up does not improve cycling time-trial performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 114, 1821-1830
    • Mills DE, Johnson MA, McPhilimey MJ, Williams NC, Gonzalez JT, Barnett YA, Sharpe GR (2014). Influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue and inspiratory muscle training on the plasma cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation. Journal of Applied Physiology, 116, 970-979
    • Brown PI, Johnson MA, Sharpe GR (2014). Determinants of inspiratory muscle strength in healthy humans. Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology, 196, 50-55
    • Johnson MA, Mills DE, Brown PI, Sharpe GR (2014). Prior upper body exercise reduces cycling work capacity but not critical power. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 46, 802-808
    • Mills DE, Johnson MA, McPhilimey MJ, Williams NC, Gonzalez JT, Barnett YA, Sharpe GR (2013). The effects of inspiratory muscle training on plasma interleukin-6 concentration during cycling exercise and a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea. Journal of Applied Physiology, 115, 1163-1172
    • Johnson MA, Mills DE, Brown DM, Bayfield KJ, Gonzalez JT, Sharpe GR (2012). Inspiratory loading intensity does not influence lactate clearance during recovery. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 44, 863-871
    • Brown PI, Sharpe GR, Johnson MA (2012). Inspiratory muscle training abolishes the blood lactate increase associated with volitional hyperpnoea superimposed on exercise and accelerates lactate and oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 112, 2117-2129
    • Johnson MA, Sharpe GR. (2011). Effects of protocol design on lactate minimum power. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 32, 199-204.
    • Brown PI, Sharpe GR, Johnson MA (2010). Loading of trained inspiratory muscles speeds lactate recovery kinetics. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42, 1103-1112
    • Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Brown PI (2009). Investigations of the lactate minimum test. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 30, 448-454
    • Brown PI, Sharpe GR, Johnson MA (2008). Inspiratory muscle training reduces blood lactate concentration during volitional hyperpnoea. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 104, 111-117
    • Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, Brown PI (2007). Inspiratory muscle training improves cycling time-trial performance and anaerobic work capacity but not critical power. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 101, 761-770
    • Johnson MA, Sharpe GR, McConnell AK (2006). Maximal voluntary hyperpnoea increases blood lactate concentration during exercise. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 96, 600-608

See all of Michael Johnson's publications...

Course(s) I teach on

  • Person using running machine
    Undergraduate | Full-time / Sandwich | 2021

    https://www.ntu.ac.uk/course/science-and-technology/ug/bsc-hons-sport-and-exercise-science

  • Sport Science MRes
    Postgraduate taught / Professional | Full-time / Part-time | 2021

    https://www.ntu.ac.uk/course/science-and-technology/pg/mres-sport-science

  • Exercise Physiology
    Postgraduate taught / Professional | Full-time / Part-time | 2021

    https://www.ntu.ac.uk/course/science-and-technology/pg/mres-exercise-physiology