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English Literary Research MRes

  • Level(s) of Study: Postgraduate taught
  • Start Date(s): September 2023
  • Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time / Part-time
  • Campus: Clifton Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

  • 73% of NTU’s research in English Language and Literature was assessed to be world-leading or internationally excellent - REF2021.
  • Study in a city steeped in literary culture - Nottingham has permanent UNESCO City of Literature status.
  • Choose your own topic of research - use this course as a solid basis for a career in research or as a bespoke masters degree.
  • This course combines the support of a taught course with the independent nature of a research degree.

The course is designed to provide you with the independence of a research degree with some of the guidance of a taught Masters. You will learn about approaches to the study of literature, and will have the opportunity to study authors, literary movements, themes or critical ideas in depth.

We are pleased to consider any literary topic but applicants are advised to email us in advance so we can match your interest with staff expertise.

What you’ll study

Studying alongside our team of academics you will become embedded in our research culture.  You will learn about approaches to the study of literature and will have the opportunity to study authors, literary movements, themes or critical ideas in depth.

The course has been designed to provide you with the independence of a research degree with some of the guidance of a taught master's. Central to the course is the dissertation, which allows you to explore, in detail, your area of literary interest. You will take part in one-to-one tutorials and the supervisor will offer advice on developing appropriate study methods and provide feedback on drafts of the dissertation.

Within the course, you will take part in student-led symposia.  These will give you the opportunity to present and exchange ideas on other students’ work.  These sessions lead to a study proposal that gives a detailed description of the dissertation topic.  The symposia encourage discussion, cooperation and the sharing of problems and solutions.

Whether you wish to take this course as a route to a PhD or as a stand-alone degree, the course structure and its assessments enable you to research a literary interest deeply, organise your ideas effectively, develop your written and oral expression, and interact in productive ways with your peers.

Specialist awards are available in:

  • MRes English Literary Research - Gay and Lesbian Studies
  • MRes English Literary Research - Modernism
  • MRes English Literary Research - Postcolonialism
  • MRes English Literary Research - Romanticism
  • MRes English Literary Research - Travel Writing
  • MRes English Literary Research - US American Literature
  • MRes English Literary Research - Women's writing
  • MRes English Literary Research - Early Modern Literature

Find out more about NTU English Literature and Language research.

This course is divided into modules, which are worth a number of credit points, and are separately taught and assessed.  To get your degree you have to pass all modules to collect 180 credit points.

There are three modes of study on this course, namely lectures delivered on the core module; student-led symposia discussions; and independent research on the dissertation module. You will have the opportunity to attend research paper presentations by fully qualified specialists in their chosen
fields, and by advanced PhD students. You will also be able to participate in discussions, and reflect upon and discuss good practice in the dissemination of research.

  • Core module -Theoretical Approaches (30 credit points): An Advanced Introduction – through two-hour sessions, taught by seminar you will examine a range of literary theories.  You will consider how their application to a variety of texts shapes our reading of the texts and our understanding of the theories themselves.
  • The Symposia (30 credit points): You will explore key theoretical and practical issues in relation to English studies in general, specific texts and practices, and to your individual dissertation topics in particular.  You will develop interpretations appropriate to postgraduate level working in a supportive, problem-solving environment based on round-table discussion.
  • Dissertation (120 credit points): The dissertation is the cornerstone of the MRes in English Literary Research.  It provides the core research project which draws together students’ understanding and skills from other elements of the English Literary Research MRes course.  It is an opportunity to demonstrate flair and imagination within the subject as well as rigorous analytic and research design abilities.

Further information on what you'll study

Jenni Ramone

Dr Jenni Ramone, Associate Professor, explains what she loves about English at NTU

"We’re a community here, and I feel that’s what makes English at NTU so special. It’s not a relationship that ends with graduation. A former student of mine got in touch recently because he’d read a book that reminded him of a module he’d taken with me. He left the University four years ago, but this book really inspired him — it took him right back to his time here, and I was so happy that he’d taken the time to approach me for more recommendations. That kind of thing happens all the time, and it’s what makes us a place to call home." Read more...

Don’t just take our word for it, hear from our students themselves

Student Profiles

Daisy Ferris

English Literary Research

My supervisors have been fantastic throughout my experience of postgraduate study so far; allowing me the space to go away and work independently, but always being on hand to offer support as and when I need it.

Richard Bromhall

English Literary Research

This course provides freedom to conduct independent research and the opportunity to work alongside experts in the field.

Charlie Jones

English Literary Research

The course has enabled me to develop my critical thinking, organisational, and research skills, which has led to me running my own team within a company within a very short space of time.

Dani Louise Olver

I really enjoy the freedom and independence of the course, I am able to pursue study in my chosen area of research. I have always found the English team and staff in the School of Arts & Humanities to be super friendly, helpful and approachable.

How you’re taught

Please note that while there is a high degree of flexibility in when students are able to conduct their hours of study, the core module is taught in two-hour weekly sessions during the first half of the year and students should be available to meet with the course leader and their supervisor during normal working hours as needed.

Assessment

You will write an essay of 4,000 words examining an aspect of one or more of the theories examined in the core course. The second assessment is a 4,000-word study proposal, outlining your dissertation plans. It will present information on your aims and methodology, offer a provisional chapter breakdown, summarise your likely argument and provide a selective, annotated bibliography. This is supplemented by a 1000-word synoptic assessment in which you will reflect on how you have developed as a researcher, and how the course has prepared you for your future – in or outside academia.

The 20,000-word dissertation is the main focus of your study and as such, it accounts for two-thirds of the overall marks for the MRes. This is on a topic of your choice, subject to staff approval, and is agreed upon in the outline when you join the course. You are strongly encouraged to discuss your ideas informally with the Programme Leader or prospective supervisor before applying. You will have an individual supervisor allocated when offered a place on the course. Dissertation tutorials will take place between you and your nominated supervisor. The supervisor will offer advice on developing appropriate study methods and provide feedback on drafts of the dissertation.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study, you also have the opportunity to learn another new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have. Learning a new language can enhance your communication skills, enrich your experience when travelling abroad and boost your career prospects. Find out more about the University Language Programme.

Further information

Research activity

The MRes English Literary Research is based in our world-renowned English department, which received exceptional results in the latest Research Exercise Framework in 2014. In this report, 87% of our research was rated as world-leading, or of international excellence.

Our work reflects the diversity of the discipline and includes textual editing, research across many Anglophone literary geographies, the history of the book, archival and manuscript research, gender and sexuality studies, migration, refugee, travel and postcolonial studies, and recovery research with a particular focus on radical cultural production. The English department hosts two research centres: the world-leading Centre for Travel
Writing Studies, founded in 2003, and the Centre for Postcolonial Studies, founded in 2000.

Find out more about English Literature and Language research.

Staff Profiles

Anna Ball

Associate Professor

English, Communications and Philosophy

Anna Ball is Associate Professor of Postcolonial Feminisms, Literatures and Cultures. She specialises in postcolonial, gender, world literary and refugee studies, and focuses particularly on the Middle East as an…

Sarah Carter

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Sarah Carter

Daniel Cordle

Associate Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Daniel Cordle is Associate Professor in English and American Literature at Nottingham Trent University. He is an expert in nuclear culture and is the author of Late Cold War Literature…

Sarah Jackson

Associate Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Sarah Jackson

Phil Leonard

Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Phil Leonard

Jenni Ramone

Associate Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Jenni Ramone is Senior Lecturer in Postcolonial Studies and co-director of the Postcolonial Studies Centre: https://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/groups-and-centres/centres/centre-for-postcolonial-studies Her research has focused on global literature, postcolonial literature, gender, and translation, approaching…

Pete Smith

Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Pete Smith Nottingham Trent University Renaissance Literature Shakespeare

Catherine Clay

Associate Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Clay is Course Leader for the MRes in English Literary Research postgraduate degree programme. She also teaches widely across the undergraduate curriculum, including modules on the Gender and Sexuality

Nicola Bowring

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Nicola Bowring is a Lecturer in English Literature, with a focus on Gothic and Romantic Literature, and Travel Writing through the related themes of space and place.

Annalise Grice

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Annalise Grice is Senior Lecturer in English Literature in the department of English, Linguistics and Philosophy.

Sharon Ouditt

Sharon Ouditt

Stephanie Palmer

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Stephanie Palmer researches and teaches American literature and women’s writing.

Amy Rushton

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Amy Rushton's research interests with postcolonial criticism, world-literature, and queer theories, with a literary focus on contemporary North American and Sub-Saharan African fiction and memoir. Their current project considers…

Andrew Thacker

Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Andrew Thacker

Nicole W. Thiara

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Nicole Thiara is Senior Lecturer in English literature. Her research interests are in the field of postcolonial studies and South Asian literature, in particular Dalit and Adivasi literature.

Rory Waterman

Associate Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr Waterman is a poet, editor, press and academic critic, and Associate Professor in Modern and Contemporary Literature at NTU, where he leads the MA Creative Writing. His specialisms are

Tim Youngs

Professor

School of Arts & Humanities

Tim Youngs is Professor Emeritus of English and Travel Studies. He continues to research and publish, deliver guest talks and conference papers, undertake peer review, and to collaborate with scholars

Careers and employability

This course will help you to develop a broad range of skills transferable to many job roles. Recent graduates have pursued a range of careers (including teaching) or have gone on to doctoral or postdoctoral research.

The course offers a range of professional and training opportunities as part of the Symposia module, including optional placements.

Re:search Re:imagined

To us, research is about more than writing papers and proposing new ideas. By daring to think differently, we’re disrupting the research landscape and finding the answers to the questions that really matter. From helping to shape international policy, to preserving our heritage, we’re inspiring the brightest minds to rise up and find solutions to some of the most significant global challenges facing society.

Find out more: ntu.ac.uk/research

Entry requirements

  • A good honours degree (minimum 2.2) in English or a related subject
  • We are pleased to consider any literary topic but applicants are advised to email us in advance so we can match your interest with staff expertise.
  • Prospective students are required to submit a 400 word outline of their proposed topic at the time of application
  • An interview.
  • Applications from candidates with non-standard entry qualifications will be considered on an individual basis if they can demonstrate relevant professional experience.

    Interviews

    All applicants will be interviewed. Interviews can be face-to-face, or through Skype or a similar method.

    Recognition of Prior Learning

    NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

    All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

All applicants will need the equivalent of:

  • A good honours degree (minimum 2.2) in English or a related subject
  • We are pleased to consider any literary topic but applicants are advised to email us in advance so we can match your interest with staff expertise.
  • Prospective students are required to submit a 400-word outline of their proposed topic at the time of application
  • An interview.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Postgraduate preparation courses (Pre-Masters)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Pre-Masters courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Tuition fees for September 2023:

Course

Full time Home (UK) tuition

Part time Home (UK) tuition*

MRes  English Literary Research

£8,200

£4,100

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. Please take a look at our postgraduates’ guide funding page for information about sourcing grants, bursaries and scholarships, and much more.

* Please note that if you are considering a part-time route that runs over more than one year, the tuition fee stated is for Year One of study. The course fee for Year Two is subject to annual review.

Fees may be subject to change.

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. Please take a look at our postgraduates’ guide funding page for information about sourcing grants, bursaries and scholarships, and much more.

Please note that if you are considering a part-time route that runs over more than one year, the tuition fee stated is for Year One of study. The course fee for Year Two is subject to annual review.

Fees may be subject to change.

Alumni Discount

We’re happy to be able to offer a 20% alumni discount to most current NTU students and recent NTU alumni. This discount is currently available for those starting an eligible postgraduate taught, postgraduate research or professional course.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service on +44 (0)115 848 2494.

Tuition fees for September 2023:

Course

Full time International and EU tuition

Part time International and EU tuition*

MRes English Literary Research

£16,800

£8,400

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your postgraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

How to apply

Ready to join us?

Just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow our step-by-step guide. You can apply for this course throughout the year. Most of our postgraduate and professional courses are popular and fill up quickly though, so apply as soon as you can.

Writing your application

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. Make sure you include as much information as possible, including uploading evidence of results already achieved, as well as a personal statement.

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process - so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU in our postgraduates’ guide. Here you’ll find advice about how to write a good personal statement and much more. Good luck with your application!

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please contact us at Ask NTU or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Apply online through our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

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