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Security Studies MA

  • Level(s) of Study: Postgraduate taught
  • Start Date(s): September 2021
  • Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time / Part-time
  • Campus: City Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

This new MA Security Studies course offers an opportunity to take part in rapidly evolving contemporary discussions on security and may serve as a pathway to doctoral studies. It focuses both on theoretical underpinnings of traditional Security Studies as well as more contemporary theorisation of Critical Security Studies.

Traditional Security Studies mainly analyses areas such as threats to state security, military strategy and tactics, utilisation of conventional and unconventional weapons, or great power politics on the international level. Critical Security Studies focuses on the opening up of the referent objects of security from state to individuals, groups, or global environment, and widening of our understanding of security threats. The course will provide you with advanced knowledge of both approaches to the study of security, combining the understanding of interrelated global security problems with their local, national, regional and global effects.

Throughout the course, you’ll have the opportunity to apply your theoretical knowledge to local security environments and institutions which the Department works closely with to nurture your specialised research focus. You may have the chance to work with organisations focusing on providing help and support of refugees, women’s charities, or local councils.

This MA is designed for anyone with wider social science or humanities background who is interested in acquiring advanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary security issues, policies and actors. MA Security Studies builds on the existing research expertise in the department, ranging from regional security structures and organisations to critical security studies.

What you’ll study

This course will provide you with a solid grounding in the global and complex security problems on all levels of analysis.

The course is designed through a combination of theory and practice to reflect the realities of the field and allow you to apply your theoretical knowledge to a variety of security-related issues. Strong focus of the course will be on critical understanding of variety of issues around: conflicts and conflict resolution; human security; global governance; gender and security; political economy; sustainable development etc. We offer a contemporary curriculum covering theoretical debates and practical developments in the field of international security. You’ll critically analyse current security policies and challenges and the interconnected nature of threats.

You’ll also have the chance to get involved with our Department led events, which range from guest lectures, parliamentary negotiation simulations to workshops in political communication.

Core modules

Approaches and Issues in International Security

This module discusses the key concepts that will help you understand and and critically analyse contemporary global security issues. We cover both traditional and critical theoretical discussions in security. We also analyse some of the key themes in contemporary Security Studies such as peacekeeping, peacebuilding, mediation and other conflict resolution tools.

Political Economy of International Security

This module explores the political economy of contemporary international security by utilising theories and methodologies found in International Relations, International Political Economy and Historical Sociology. Throughout the module you will look at security as a dynamic, contentious and evolving issue area. Thus, the module will consider state and non-state actors as well as processes that take place at all levels.

Researching Political Issues

The aim of this module is to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the methods, techniques, and processes that are involved in the research of Politics and International Relations. The first section of the module will develop your awareness of exactly what advanced social research entails. The second section of the module will seek to deepen and enhance the knowledge gained in section one, with a series of guest speakers offering you insights as to their own experiences of researching Politics and International Relations.

Dissertation, Work-based Experience or Policy Lab

The final core component of the MA International Relations course is an extended piece of written work, which entails three options that students can choose from.

The first 'standard' option comprises the development of a coherent and viable research proposal on a topic of your choice, with its eventual assessment being a 12,000 word dissertation. The other option involves a period of work-based learning, spending time engaging with a chosen institution or community-based organisation, either in the local Nottinghamshire community or further afield. Here, in contrast to the development of a research proposal geared for the completion of a standard 12,000 word dissertation, your assessment will comprise a research plan of how you intend to draw on your experiences, which ultimately will culminate in a written work-based project of a maximum of 10,000 words.

The Policy Labs module places an emphasis on gaining practical research experience and meaningful engagement with external (or internal) partners on a real policy issue. Policy Labs comprise small groups working in close collaboration and making their recommendations after close consultation with partners and supervision by academic staff. External partners may come from the public, private and/or civil society and academia. Internal partners may include departmental research teams and internal organisations. The program is intended to focus on policy problems within the East Midlands region, but some Policy Labs may focus on national or international issues.

You will also choose one of the following optional modules:*

Negotiating in International Contexts

This module focuses strengthening your negotiation and diplomacy skills. It is for those interested in developing their diplomatic and negotiation skills as well as their ability to form reasoned arguments and speak confidently in public. The module is centred around a simulation of the EU decision making. The best students will then have a chance to participate in the prestigious, annual international EuroSim competition held in either the US or Europe, or any other extracurricular simulation activity (for example Model UN).

Global Governance and International Institutions

This module provides a programme of study on the concept, theories and processes of global governance with a focus on the role of contemporary international institutions. The study of global governance is becoming increasingly important in a world facing a multitude of problems requiring multilateral action.

Democracy, Citizenship and Sustainability

This module considers the history and evolution of democracy, citizenship and sustainability. Drawing on interdisciplinary disciplines such as political theory/the history of political thought, citizenship studies, environmental politics and policy, the module situates itself within two, key prominent debates: the perceived crises of liberal democracy, and the increasingly severe environmental dislocations characteristic of our times.

Gender and Security

This module uses gender lens to study security issues, We will cover the key theories like Feminist International Relations, Feminist Security Studies, Feminist Global Political Economy or Feminist Peace Studies and apply core concepts like gender mainstreaming, violence as a continuum or representation to a range of contemporary issues. We will focus on gendered aspects of militarisation, analyse conflict resolution and perpetration of violence. We will also discuss issues such as global health policies, feminisation of poverty, or gender activism.

* The number of places available on some optional modules may be limited. These will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Students who are unable to select their first choice will be offered an alternative from the remaining optional modules.

International Politics of Health

In this module you will study a range of current and emerging threats to human health and well-being, all of which are considered to be of global significance. Importantly, though, whether considering HIV / AIDS, food and water security, potential pandemic viral strains or the health effects of globalisation itself, in each case you will examine the wider global politico-economic and cultural context of disease and critique the intervention response of the global community and the activities of relevant international organisations.

* The number of places available on some optional modules may be limited. These will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Students who are unable to select their first choice will be offered an alternative from the remaining optional modules.

How you’re taught

The course is delivered through traditional lectures and seminars and complex role-playing of international institution negotiations exercises. Other teaching methods include project-based work, presentations, discussions and simulations. You'll have the opportunity to participate in seminars, workshops and joint work with students of other postgraduate courses.

You'll benefit from our Student-Centred Active Learning Environment with Upside-Down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP), where learning is done through problem solving, sharing ideas, giving and receiving feedback and peer-to-peer teaching.

Assessment methods

Assessment on the course involves coursework, conducting your own research piece, individual and group class presentations and a reflective assessment. To encourage and facilitate independent learning the course will take full advantage of NTU's online workspace (NOW).

An active research environment

Teaching on the course is drawn directly from regionally aligned research strengths in the Middle East, North Africa, Asia, the Indian sub-continent, and Europe. This research feeds directly into the course allowing you to learn about the latest issues in this field from world-renowned experts.

Find out more about research in Politics and International Relations.

In-sessional English language support

In-sessional English language support classes are available to all international (non-EU) students studying on degree courses at NTU. There is no extra charge for these classes.

Staff Profiles

Imad El-Anis

Associate Professor

School of Social Sciences

Dr Imad El-Anis is an Associate Professor in International Relations at Nottingham Trent University’s Department of Social and Political Sciences. He is an expert in the International Relations and Political…

Katerina Krulisova

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Katerina Krulisova is a Lecturer in International Relations in the Department of Social and Political Sciences, School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University. Katerina holds a BA degree in International…

Sagarika Dutt

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Sagarika Dutt

Oliver Harrison

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Dr Oliver Harrison is a Senior Lecturer in Political Theory at NTU.

Jonathan Gorry

Principal Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Jonathan Gorry is Deputy Head of Department (Principal Lecturer) for the Department of Social and Political Sciences at Nottingham Trent University.

Eva Zemandl

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Eva Zemandl Lecturer at NTU in Public Policy, Politics and International Relations.

Dr Nathan Jones

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Nathan Jones is a lecturer in Politics in the Division of Politics and International Relations. He specialises in comparative European politics, party politics, elections and electoral systems, voter behaviour, and

Careers and employability

As a graduate of this course, you'll have had the opportunity to reflect on the subject and transferable skills you have learnt while preparing coursework. These include expertise in writing complex, yet concise, analytical pieces, develop and implement projects, diplomatic and negotiation skills, and the ability to present in-depth ideas with confidence. You'll also be encouraged to articulate these skills in relation to particular occupations that you may be interested in pursuing.

This course focuses on developing the following skills: analysis, communication, time-management, team-working, problem solving, and IT / modern technologies. Each module on this course is designed to engage students in developing these skills, which often form part of assessed assignments.

You may also seek an internship and / or a placement during the summer months, you will be assisted by the course team to help you find relevant roles.

Graduates from this course are ready to undertake a wide range of careers and professions. Previous graduates from within the Department of Politics and International Relations have gone on to work in relevant government departments as well as joined international aid and development agencies.

Employability team

Our expert Employability team will work closely with you at every stage of your career planning, providing personal support and advice. You can benefit from this service at any time during your studies, and for up to three years after completing your course. Find out more about the service.

Campus and facilities

As a Social Sciences student you will have easy access to the fantastic facilities in the Chaucer and Taylor buildings including:

  • Lecture theatres and teaching classrooms;
  • Open access PCs and secure wireless points;
  • Study areas and social spaces;
  • Chaucer cafe serving drinks and light snacks;
  • Our School of Social Sciences reception, providing you with easy access to our helpful and friendly support staff.

IT resources

Our IT resource rooms and PC clusters are distributed across our City Campus, with PCs providing access to Microsoft Office, email, web browsing, networked file storage and high-speed online printing services, with a free printing allowance for each student.

Resource rooms are available 24 hours a day.

Books and library resources

Our state-of-the-art Boots library will give you access to an extensive and diverse range of books and periodicals that focus on specialist areas within the built environment. The library's OneSearch system provides access to all our electronic resources, journals and books.

Within the library there is a liaison librarian who has specialist subject knowledge and can offer detailed help in finding and using print and electronic resources, and also with areas such as Harvard referencing and research skills.

Entry requirements

Applying with prior qualifications

  • You will need an undergraduate degree equivalent to a UK undergraduate honours degree (normally 2.2 or above).

If you hold a first degree but it doesn't meet the entry requirements above, please refer to the information below.

Applying with non-standard entry qualifications/experience

  • Applicants with non-standard entry qualifications and/or relevant experience will be considered on an individual basis. You will be required to demonstrate how your experiences and knowledge would enable you to study this course at Masters-level in your Personal Statement.

No references are required when applying for this course.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions team or call +44 (0)115 848 4200.

We accept qualifications from universities all over the world for entry onto our courses. If you’re not sure how your international qualification matches our course requirements please visit our international qualifications page.

Applying with prior qualifications

  • You will need an undergraduate degree equivalent to a UK undergraduate honours degree (normally a 2.2 or above).

If you hold a first degree but it doesn't meet the entry requirements above, please refer to the information below.

Applying with non-standard entry qualifications/experience

  • Applicants with non-standard entry qualifications and/or relevant experience will be considered on an individual basis. You will be required to demonstrate how your experiences and knowledge would enable you to study this course at Masters-level in your Personal Statement.

No references are required when applying for this course.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

Pre-masters and foundation courses

If you need to do a foundation or pre-masters course to meet our course requirements please visit Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC). If you’re already studying in the UK at a school or college and would like to know if we can accept your qualification please visit our foundation and pre-masters courses page.

English language entry requirements

If English is not your first language you need to show us that your language skills are strong enough for intensive academic study. We usually ask for an IELTS test and we accept some alternative English language tests.

For a list of our language requirements please visit our English language page.

If you need to do a pre-sessional English language course to meet the English requirements please visit our pre-sessional English course page.

Help and support

If you have any questions about your qualifications or about making an application to the University please contact our international team for advice.

Fees and funding

Fees

Study route Home (UK students)
Full-time £7,500
Part-time (cost per year of study) £3,750 (for Year One*)

The above fees are for 2021 entry fees.

* Please note that if you are considering a part-time route that runs over more than one year, the tuition fee stated is for Year One of study. The course fee for Year Two is subject to annual review.

Funding your studies

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there's no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

There are numerous sources of funding available for postgraduate students, both from external sources such as the Government and funding bodies, and from the University.

There are two main costs involved with postgraduate study: the cost of your tuition fees which is paid directly to the University, and living expenses such as accommodation, travel and food.

You might be able to get a scholarship to help fund your studies, We award scholarships to those students who can demonstrate excellent achievement, passion and dedication to their studies.

Please take a look at our postgraduate fees and funding page for information about sourcing grants, bursaries and scholarships, and much more.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

Fees

Study routeInternational / EU students
Full-time £15,500
Part-time (cost per year of study) £7,750 (for Year One*)

The above fees are for 2021 entry.

* Please note that if you are considering a part-time route that runs over more than one year, the tuition fee stated is for Year One of study. The course fee for Year Two is subject to annual review.

Funding your studies

We offer prestigious scholarships to new international students holding offers to study at the University.

For more information on these and other opportunities for funding please visit our international scholarships page.

For information on how to pay your fees to the University please visit our international fee payment page.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

How to apply

All applications to this course can be made through our NTU Applicant Portal.

You can apply for this course throughout the year. Most of our postgraduate courses are popular and fill up quickly though, so apply as soon as you can. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. Make sure you include as much information as possible, including uploading evidence of results already achieved, as well as a personal statement.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU in our postgraduates’ guide.

All applications welcome

We welcome applications from prospective students with a range of qualifications and experience, and all are assessed on an individual basis. Applicants who do not meet the standard entry criteria can still be considered providing they have relevant experience to compliment any qualifications. All applicants will need to apply through our NTU Applicant Portal.

If you're applying without prior qualifications, you'll need to submit comprehensive details of your achievements with evidence to substantiate your claim (any documentation can be uploaded to the My Documents section of the Applicant Portal). This type of application will be considered with respect to the University’s provision for ‘accreditation for prior experiential learning’. Decisions regarding the accreditation of prior learning are a matter of academic judgement.

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process - so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Open days

The School of Social Sciences holds open events throughout the year. Come along and learn more about our courses, speak to programme leaders and find out about studying with the School.

Getting in touch

If you need more help or support, you can call our Admissions Team on +44 (0)115 848 4200, or email applications@ntu.uk.

Good luck with your application!

All applications to this course can be made through our NTU Applicant Portal.

You can apply for this course throughout the year. Most of our postgraduate courses are popular and fill up quickly though, so apply as soon as you can. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Apply for your course as early as you can so that you have time to prepare for your studies. If you need a visa to study here you need to plan this into your application.

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process - so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Getting in touch

If you need more help or support, you can call our Admissions Team on +44 (0)115 848 4200, or email applications@ntu.uk.

Good luck with your application!

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