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Group

Critical Poetics Research Group

Unit(s) of assessment: English Language and Literature

Research theme: Global Heritage

School: School of Arts and Humanities

Overview

Established in 2015, Critical Poetics is an interdisciplinary research group that seeks to stimulate debate, collaboration and innovation among scholars and practitioners whose work is concerned with creative and critical theory and practice.  Collaborating with regional, national and international partners, and bringing together perspectives from a wide range of fields in order to inspire new forms of engagement with pressing social, political, cultural and environmental concerns, it provides a home for writers, researchers and artists who work across disciplines to explore the role of creative-critical writing in promoting cross-cultural conversation and driving social change.

The Critical Poetics Research Group (CPRG) is located in the English Department and is directed by Dr Sarah Jackson. Further details about CPRG activities are available here.

Collaboration

Five Bodies (a series of workshops and poetry readings organised in collaboration with Nottingham Contemporary exploring critical and creative practice)

Crossed Lines (AHRC-funded project led by Dr Sarah Jackson)

Publications

Recent publications [selected]:

  • Cocker, E. and D. Maier, No telos! (Nottingham: Beam Editions, 2019)
  • Cordle, D. and J. Dixon (eds), Writing the Contemporary: Poetry and Postcards from UNESCO Cities of Literature (Nottingham: Trent Editions, 2019)
  • Jackson, S. and C. Bostock (eds), Unidentifiable Literary Objects: A Special Issue, Parallax, 25.3 (2019)
  • Leonard, P. and T. G. Rapatzikou (eds), Digital Literary Production and the Humanities: A Special Issue, Gramma: Journal of Theory & Criticism, 23 (2016)
  • Taylor, A., Not There-Here (Bristol: Shearsman, 2021)
  • Waterman, R., Sweet Nothings (Manchester: Carcanet, 2020)

Related projects

Current and Recent PhD Projects:

  • Victoria Zoe Callus, Paper Cuts: Investigating Paper Affect in Contemporary Experimental Literature
  • Linda Clark, ‘That’s Not How It should End!’: the effect of reader/player responses on the development of narrative
  • Hannah Cooper-Smithson, Patterns in Nature: The Use of Poetic Form in Contemporary Ecopoetry
  • Jean Morris, Promised Lands - A Psycho-Social Account of Statelessness
  • Iain Spillman, The Flashing and Fading of Consciousness in Perception': The Fictional Freud in Literature and Theory
  • Alyson Stoneman, Contemporary Poetry, Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding
  • Lauren Terry, Museums of Memory: Modernist Poetics, Psychoanalysis, and the Material Object