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Media and Film & TV BA (Hons)

  • Level(s) of Study: Undergraduate
  • UCAS Code(s): P391
  • Start Date(s): September 2022
  • Duration: Three years full-time, four-seven years part-time
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time
  • Campus: Clifton Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

Develop an in-depth knowledge of the media industry, from a theoretical understanding of media and culture to its practical application across multiple platforms online, on screen and in print.

This popular and exciting degree will allow you to learn from industry professionals and academics who are creating the latest innovative research within the field.

You’ll examine a range of texts and aspects of media including lifestyle magazines, social networking sites, advertising, public relations, gaming, and journalism. From this you’ll develop advanced critical analysis skills of media texts, audiences, and institutions.

Film & TV complements media by helping you to progress with your learning and understanding of both industries and how they are connected. This subject will help to build your understanding of how film and TV programmes are constructed, work, and create meaning for audiences. You’ll learn about the role of the audience in global organisations and through digital media. NTU stands out with this course as you have the opportunity to study international cinema in depth.

You’ll be encouraged to undertake work experience with influential organisations to build your CV and enhance your connections within the industry.

  • This degree offers work placement opportunities.
  • Study this course full-time or part-time. See How to Apply section.

What you’ll study

There is a lot of flexibility in the structure of a Joint Honours degree, allowing you to tailor a package to your developing academic interests.

During your first year, you’ll study four core modules which provide a clear and exciting framework for your development at later stages.

In the second year you’ll study three core modules. You’ll also be able to select a number of optional modules based on your individual interests or spend the second half of the year on international exchange at one of our partner universities.

In the final year, you’ll undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice and select four optional modules. You must select at least one module from each subject.

Core modules

Reading the Screen: Approaches to Film and Television studies

Reading the Screen provides the vital foundations for further study of film and television. It stresses the importance of film and television as cultural forms and explores ways through which we can make sense of them, investigating them as objects of study and account for their similarities and their differences.

International Cinemas I

Complementing Reading the Screen, this module provides you with an introduction to a range of non-Hollywood cinemas to give you a growing awareness of the diversity of international cinema in terms of its stylistic choices and the contexts to which it responds. Cinemas which are typically covered will include European, Asian and African ones but may also embrace other world cinemas.

Understanding Media

This module explores representation and identity; media production and regulation; the way media forms are consumed; and what it's like to work in the media. Throughout this module, you'll investigate the place of media within culture and society more generally and be introduced to principle theories, concepts and approaches.

Screen and Sound Media: Culture and Practice

This module introduces you to a range of key academic texts that examine and theorise screen media (film, television, the computer etc.) and sound media (popular music etc.). You'll also produce a group project based on media culture or media practice.

- OR -

Introduction to Media Practice and Production

This module provides a foundation in the skills required for effective media project work. It explores the principal elements of creating media content through understanding narrative, still and moving image and sound, and the practical and theoretical relationship between those elements.

Some optional modules may be studied on the City campus.

Core modules

Media, Theory and Society

Develop your knowledge of theoretical approaches to understanding the media and culture. This module will help you to understand some of the key theoretical approaches that are used in the study of media, communication and culture. You'll develop a familiarity of important theoretical approaches used in contemporary media and for the use of cultural analysis.

Theorising the Screen

This module explores some of the key theories that have shaped our understanding of the screen. It draws upon classic works of film theory and television studies as well as theories that have adhered to more marginal and alternative screens, audiences, and industries.

Humanities in the workplace

This module will give you a taste of live industry experience. You will complete a placement for a minimum of 37 hours, write a report around your experience and follow clear work-based learning objectives.

Media optional modules

The City and Popular Culture

This module will investigate the effect that urbanisation has on popular culture by exploring a selection of case studies such as urban exploitation, street-corner society, suburban life and the night-time economy. You'll focus on using your analysis skills and develop research skills either individually or by working within a small group.

Analysing Popular Music

Analysing Popular Music has two major concerns: firstly, to develop a social understanding of transatlantic popular music and secondly, to develop a cultural-historical perspective on its development over the past 100 years and more. This module introduces you to theoretical approaches to the study of popular music, allowing you to engage in independent critical analysis of popular music and popular musical cultures.

Creative Documentary

This module will encourage you to examine  the key critical issues of documentary production such as authenticity and ethics. To prepare you for your dissertation in Year Three, you'll create a 5-10 minute documentary as a group (or individually) and be encouraged to creatively and critically engage with the given styles and genres of documentary.

Researching Media, Communication and Culture

This module introduces the key empirical methods and analytical approaches of Media and Cultural Studies. It enables you to produce original research, and to gain greater understanding of the methods you might use in your Media dissertation. It outlines a range of methods, and shows how these can be applied to particular media and cultural case studies.

Intermediate Media Practice and Production

During this module you'll undertake an in-depth media production project for and with a local external not-for profit, charitable or voluntary organisation. This module will focus on developing your skills in media production and you'll reflect on issues surrounding citizenship and media access.

Film & TV optional modules

British Cinema

This module examines British Cinema since the 1960s. It looks at a wide range of films to understand how British cinema represents issues such as nation, class, race and gender. It discusses key genres, movements and theoretical debates.

Analysing British Television

This module introduces you to key ways of understanding the development of British television. It examines the evolution of British television industries and institutions from their beginnings up to the present, looking at important factors and influences that have shaped the industry over time. It explores different accounts of ‘Britishness’ both in television shows or formats and in the relationship between television producers and audiences.

European Cinema and the City

This module starts from the dual observation that cinema is the art of the modern and that the city is the space of the modern. It builds on this to examine the interaction of cinema and the urban: how film has both represented and been shaped by the city.

Some optional modules may be studied on the City campus.

Core module

Dissertation

The final year dissertation module enables you to undertake a sustained, single piece of independently researched work on a topic of your choice, under expert supervision.

OR

Humanities Research Project

Explore your interests in a way that draws on both subject areas. Combine the knowledge and skills you have gained in each of your subjects to complete an interdisciplinary piece of research. You can deliver your project either as a written dissertation or through an alternative creative format such as a publication, film, podcast, website, or performance, supported by a shorter essay.

Media optional modules

Lifestyle and Consumer Culture

Explore key approaches to understanding lifestyle and the culture of consumption. You'll be introduced to many important theoretical approaches to understand lifestyle and consumer culture and you'll use many case studies such as travel and tourism to evaluate these.

Cultural Policy

Explore a range of debates within the developing field of policy study which relate to the development of media. You'll examine some of the key institutions within which policies relating to film, television, the visual arts, heritage and other creative industries are determined. You'll explore questions such as: what is cultural value and how important are the cultural and creative industries?

The Body and Popular Culture

How is the body represented in popular culture? Examine key ideas such as how we might understand the various meanings surrounding the body across a range of media and cultural forms. By studying a selection of case studies, you'll explore the way that the body is addressed and located within popular culture, for example, from music to sport.

Client-Led Media Practice and Production

During this module you'll be able to focus on the development of skills in media production by completing a media project that will be set to a 'real brief'. This is an opportunity for you to enhance your employability options by participating in live projects with a real purpose. This module will encourage you to make connections between theory and practice.

Film & TV optional modules

American Television since 1950

This module examines American television from the 1950s to the current moment. It moves from the emergence of the Classic Network Era through to the Post-Network era of digital television. It places American television in its historical, industrial and cultural context. It considers the formal and aesthetic properties of American television programmes and engages with the organisation and history of network television (for example NBC) and cable television (for example HBO).

American Cinema since 1949: Margins and Mainstreams

This very popular module explores American cinema from 1949 to the present day by looking at different but interrelated areas of production, typically including Hollywood, the independent sector, and the experimental-underground cinema.

International Cinemas II

This module considers a variety of subjects pertaining to the study of international cinemas. Issues and concepts such as slow cinema, New Wave cinema, Diasporic filmmaking and world cinema blockbusters will feature amongst case studies of European, South American and Asian cinemas. While it will pay due attention to film style and form and to the way films engage with socio-cultural and political contexts, it will also examine the policy and film industrial frameworks within which film is produced.

European Cinema: Globalisation and Resistance

This module begins by accounting for the factors that explain the domination of global Hollywood in terms of industrial organisation, film marketing, distribution and exhibition and, of course, the films themselves. This module analyses the different ‘survival’ strategies developed by European film (imitation of Hollywood, specialisation or the provision of alternative forms), building a strong sense of the material conditions the European film industry must deal with in the process.

Don’t just take our word for it, hear from our students themselves

Student Profiles

Ikea Wint

Media and Film & TV

The course has allowed me to develop key transferable skills such as leadership, communication, delegation and prioritisation.

Aayushi Pandey

Media and Film & TV

I would recommend NTU to everyone, I have never met anyone who second guesses their decision to come here. NTU challenges you at every step, but in a good way.

Laura Savage

Media and Film & TV

I am in the last stages of working for an event management company who are hosting the Nottingham Media Festival and have been part of the preparations and actual festival so far.

How you’re taught

How will I learn?

Each year you’ll choose a range of core and optional modules from the lists above. The first year is normally divided equally between the two joint honours subjects but at the end of Year One, you’ll have the opportunity to select between an equally weighted joint honours course and a more specialised pathway, depending on your interests.

Teaching principally takes place through a combination of lectures, where tutors introduce the key ideas, and seminars, where smaller groups discuss those ideas.

Contact hours

If you’re struggling with a topic or require additional support or guidance, you can arrange to see your tutors in small groups or one-to-one, to discuss essay plans or to seek some specific academic guidance.

It is the nature of the subjects offered in the School of Arts and Humanities, however, that much of your time will be spent engaged in independent study. We recognise that this marks a change of culture from school or college, and we have in place a system of study support to help you adapt to this.

International exchange

You’ll also have the option to take part in an international exchange at a partner university. These options will enable you to gain impressive international experience, and broaden your perspective and career ambitions.

You’ll experience other cultures, travel the globe and open your eyes to a world of opportunities. Our exchange partnership with a number of international universities enables you to live and study in another country in your second year. Find out more.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study you also have the opportunity to learn another new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have. Learning a new language can enhance your communication skills, enrich your experience when travelling abroad and boost your career prospects. Find out more about the University Language Programme.

Contact hours

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (27%), independent study (73%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (75%) and placements (2%)
  • Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (23%), independent study (77%)

Staff Profiles

Colin Alexander (Dr)

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Dr. Colin Alexander is Senior Lecturer in Political Communications within the Communication and Society subject team at the School of Arts and Humanities

Simon Cross

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Simon Cross

Ben Taylor

Principal Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Ben Taylor

Steven Jones

Principal Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Steven Jones

How you’re assessed

  • Year 1 coursework (75%) and written (25%)
  • Year 2 coursework (100%)
  • Year 3 coursework (60%) and written (40%)

Careers and employability

Your career development

Career development is seen as a major part of the curriculum. Key transferable skills are emphasised and there are opportunities to develop links with organisations and potential employers. As a result we have an outstanding record of graduate employment.

Joint honours courses develop a wide range of skills. These include written and oral communication skills; critical analysis; the ability to work independently and in groups; time management; self-motivation; and a variety of IT skills.

Graduates have gone on to forge successful careers both within large, well known organisations (such as Marks and Spencer, BBC etc.) and the small to medium sized companies that constitute much of the UK economy. Recent graduate roles have included law, publishing, marketing, PR, retail and finance.

Recent Media graduates have also gone on to work in graduate-level positions with the BBC, Sky, Brit Asia TV, Channel 5 and IBM.

Many graduates also choose to undertake further study on one of our Masters-level courses or MPhil and PhD research degrees.

Entry requirements

112 UCAS Tariff points

  • 112 UCAS tariff points from up to four qualifications (two of which must be A-level equivalent), or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma - DMM.
  • GCSEs - English and Maths grade C / 4.

Other qualifications and experience

We consider equivalent qualifications and combinations, please see UCAS course search for details and use our calculator to help you work out how many UCAS points your qualifications relate to.

We may also consider credits achieved at other universities and your work/life experience through an assessment of prior learning. This may be for year one entry, or beyond the beginning of a course where applicable, for example, into year 2. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available for this route.

Contextual offers

As well as assessing your application and qualifications, we use contextual data and information to make offers for this course. Depending on your circumstances, we may make you an offer up to two grades below the standard entry criteria. Find out how we assess your application.

Personal statements

For advice on how to write a good personal statement please visit our personal statement page.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions and Enquiries Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

You will need the equivalent to:

  • 112 UCAS tariff points from up to four qualifications (two of which must be A-level equivalent), or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma - DMM.
  • GCSEs - English and Maths grade C / 4.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Undergraduate preparation courses (Foundation)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Foundation courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Advanced standing (starting your undergraduate degree in year 2 or 3)

You may be able to start your undergraduate course in year 2 or 3 based on what you have studied before. This decision would be made in accordance with our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy.

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service on +44 (0)115 848 2494.

Additional Costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. Our libraries provide a good supply of essential text books, journals and materials (many of which you can access online) – meaning you may not need to purchase as many books as you might think! There may also be a supply of second-hand books available for purchase from previous year students.

Field trips

All essential field trip costs will be included in your course fees. There may be the opportunity to take part in optional field trips, which do incur additional costs.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Please see our fees page for more information.

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your undergraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can.

For the full-time route just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow our step-by-step guide.

If you're applying for the part-time route please apply online using the NTU Applicant Portal.

Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You've got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up-to-date

After you've applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Need help with your application?

For admissions related enquiries please contact us:

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 4200

Email or Ask us a question

You can apply for this course through UCAS. If you are not applying to any other UK universities, you can apply directly to us on our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

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