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Wildlife Conservation BSc (Hons)

  • Level(s) of Study: Undergraduate
  • UCAS Code(s): D447 / D449
  • Start Date(s): October 2022
  • Duration: Three years full-time, four years with placement
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time / Sandwich
  • Campus: Brackenhurst Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

This course combines the scientific principles of animal function and behaviour with conservation biology. You’ll explore current areas of global concern, including the effects of habitat loss on wild species, alongside approaches to their conservation. This course will give you sound knowledge of ecological processes and theories while developing the skills to identify, monitor and manage wild animals and their habitats.

If you have any questions about our Wildlife Conservation course, you can now chat to our experienced lecturers and course leaders through Unibuddy.

Which course is right for you?

We offer three conservation degrees, each with a different focus:

  • BSc (Hons) Wildlife Conservation (this course) - explores behavioural and population ecology and has more of a focus on animal species and conservation management.
  • BSc (Hons) Ecology and Conservation - explores community and ecosystem ecology (i.e. larger scale ecology) and has more of a focus on habitats, plants and the habitat requirements of species.
  • FdSc Wildlife Conservation - is more vocational, with greater emphasis on practical and applied skills.
  • You'll learn on our rural Brackenhurst Campus – a 200-hectare estate including farmland, woodland and wetland with a diverse range of habitats. With easy access to Nottingham city centre, you get the best of both worlds.
  • You will take part in a residential overseas field course to Spain during your second year. This will enable you to study wildlife in a range of habitats. The field course includes studies on: Estimating the presence of brown bears. Sampling the population of wolves via howl recordings. Using invertebrate sampling to determine water quality.
  • You will also take part in a residential field course in your final year. There is the opportunity to study wildlife in the UK (Pembrokshire) or South Africa (Mankwe Wildlife Reserve). The field courses currently include studies on: Coastal management. The effect of savannah burning on large mammal diversity.
  • You can choose to take part in our International Exchange programme and study abroad for part of your course. You'll get the chance to volunteer with extra projects, such as surveying great crested newts, ringing birds and trapping small mammals on campus.

What you’ll study

This course explores animal science alongside wildlife management and conservation biology. You’ll acquire sound knowledge of ecological processes and theories while developing the skills to identify, monitor and manage wild animals and their habitats.

Your lectures will cover topics such as:

  • anatomy and physiology
  • behaviour
  • evolution
  • wildlife surveying
  • habitat management

Applied Anatomy and Physiology

Gain a broad understanding of animal structure and function across a range of species. This includes cell physiology, molecular genetics, transport systems, and reproduction.

Behaviour

Study patterns of behaviour and the reasons why animals behave as they do, both in the wild and in captivity. Topics covered include learning, sexual behaviour, communication, aggression, social structure, resource acquisition, and behaviour in captive and natural environments.

Biodiversity Conservation

Explore the biological diversity on Earth, focusing on the abundance and distribution of species. Investigate theories addressing evolution, the causes of mass extinctions, and the conservation of species.

Conservation Organisations and Wildlife Issues

Investigate the role that various organisations play in the conservation of wildlife across the globe. Debate topical wildlife issues, such as the relationship between badgers and TB. National and global dimensions of wildlife law and policy are tackled, with the issues of securing biodiversity and the associated questions of sustainability forming an important theme.

Ecological Census Techniques

Study the purpose of, and undertake, ecological surveys using industry recognised techniques. Learn species identification for a range of taxonomic groups such as birds, plants and invertebrates.

Principles of Ecology

Study the interaction of biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) factors in relation to the distribution of populations and communities within ecosystems

Applied Habitat Management

Study a wide range of natural, semi-natural and man-made habitat types and associated species. Look at integrated management techniques for multi-use habitats via site-based evaluations.

Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecology

Explore the way in which animals behave in relation to their environment. Study areas such as the selfish gene, optimal foraging, game theory, and sexual selection.

Experimental Design and Analysis

Cultivate an understanding of research methodology, hypothesis testing, statistical analysis, and data presentation. You’ll also learn to plan and conduct scientific studies, and to analyse the data collected.

Wildlife Field Techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Develop an understanding of the processes involved in assessing the status of wildlife using a range of field techniques plus data acquisition and processing, particularly through GIS. This module includes a week-long field course in Spain

Law and Policy

Gain an introduction to the broad range of legal and policy issues that affect those engaged in wildlife conservation and protecting the environment. You’ll learn about the national and global dimensions of wildlife law and policy, including issues of securing biodiversity and sustainability.

Wildlife Population Biology

Develop an understanding of wildlife population dynamics and the transmission and control of diseases. Explore the principles of inheritance and how these may be applied within population biology and the management of selective breeding programmes.

    This is a placement year for students on the four-year course.

Conservation Ecology

Explore the communities and ecosystems of terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. Look at the impacts that humans and environmental change have upon them.

Dissertation

Undertake independent research under supervision. Focus on your own area of interest within wildlife conservation. Previous studies include the behaviour of translocated ospreys, the impact of countryside stewardship on farmland birds, and the influence of visitors on captive orangutans.

Wildlife Management

Understand the ecology and dynamics of animal populations. Evaluate practices such as harvesting, population control and species reintroduction.

You'll also choose two optional modules, one of which must be a field course:

Africa Field Course

Investigate the function and conservation of African ecosystems by way of a ten-day residential field trip. You’ll undertake surveys and assessments and explore their implications.

UK Field Course

Investigate the function and conservation of UK ecosystems by way of a ten-day residential field trip. You’ll undertake surveys and assessments and explore their implications.

Adaptive Physiology

Consider how animals cope with challenging environments, such as high altitudes or the deep sea.

Wildlife Conflicts and Resolution

Critically analyse topical issues relating to wildlife conservation, and develop your understanding of the importance of ethical theories and scientific methods in forming views

Don’t just take our word for it, hear from our students themselves

Student Profiles

Rachael Griffiths

Wildlife Conservation

The modules presented on the NTU open day gave me pure excitement, knowing that this university can assist me in seeing my own potential, and lead me down a career path I am most passionate about.

Victoria Ireland

Wildlife Conservation

My knowledge, perception and opinion on conservation has changed greatly since the start of my degree. My desirable career path changes weekly, and I am frequently changing my thoughts and values about the best approach to conservation.

Alice Hill

Wildlife Conservation

It’s wonderful being a student here. There are many events for students to get involved in, you will make so many friends and memories to last you a lifetime. I really couldn’t imagine studying anywhere else.

Connel Bradwell

Wildlife Conservation

Being somewhere like Brackenhurst Campus, surrounded by people who had similar interests in such a beautiful place really helped to build my confidence.

Tom-Winterton

Wildlife Conservation

The content of the course delivered at NTU gives students the knowledge and skills to find employment in the environmental sector and make a difference.

Hannah Knipe

Wildlife Conservation

The South Africa trip offered as part of the course was one of the highlights of my time at NTU and I left feeling more passionate and inspired to protect endangered species.

Bryony-Carling

Wildlife Conservation

Brackenhurst was the best campus I could have asked for. The staff are incredible as they genuinely care about you and try to make sure you get the results you deserve.

Catherine Romero

Wildlife Conservation

The trip to Spain was definitely one of the best weeks of my life.

Harry Muschamp

Wildlife Conservation

BSc (Hons) Wildlife Conservation covers a very broad range of topics, from the anatomy and physiology of animals, to the laws and policies that protect them. If you have an interest in wildlife there will be a topic for you.

Theresa Zett

Wildlife Conservation

A strong argument for me was the fact that Brackenhurst is outside the city with lots of fields and wildlife, and provides so many opportunities for practical sessions.

Video Gallery

Tom tells us about his life as a student at Nottingham Trent University and the optional South Africa Field trip. Holly tells us about her life as a student studying BSc (Hons) Wildlife Conservation at Nottingham Trent University. Facility tour video which gives an insight of the equipment we use and what students do on the BSc Wildlife Conservation course.
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How you’re taught

You will be taught through a variety of methods including group seminars, lectures and practical sessions.

Contact hours

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (26%) and independent study (74%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (26%) and independent study (74%)
  • Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (25%) and independent study (75%)

A placement year may be taken between year 2 and year 3 of study.

Staff Profiles

Louise Gentle

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Dr Louise Gentle

Adam Bates

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Dr Adam Bates is a senior Lecturer in the environment group in the School of Animal, Rural & Environmental Sciences and an active researcher in a variety of areas including

Dr Anna Champneys

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Dr Anna Champneys is a lecturer in wildlife conservation and animal behaviour. Her current modules are Biodiversity Conservation and Behaviour. Her research interests include: distribution, habitat selection and genetics of…

Antonio Uzal

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Dr. Antonio Uzal FHEA MCIEEM. Senior Lecturer in Wildlife Conservation.

Richard Yarnell

Associate Professor

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Richard Yarnell (Dr)

Sally Little

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Sally Little is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal, Rural & Environmental Sciences and Course Lead for BSc (Hons) Environmental Science. Sally Little researches the impact of environmental

Helen Hicks

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Dr Hicks is a Lecturer in Environmental Sciences in the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences at Brackenhurst. She believes strongly in research informed teaching and is particularly committed

Mathew Edwards

Senior Lecturer

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Mathew Edwards

Chris Royle

School Standards and Quality Manager

School of Animal Rural & Environmental Sciences

Chris Royle

How you’re assessed

  • Year 1 coursework (67%), written (33%)
  • Year 2 coursework (50%), written (50%)
  • Year 3 coursework (83%), written (17%)

Careers and employability

Your future career

This course will give you a range of transferable skills, enabling you to work in the diverse field of wildlife conservation both in the UK and overseas.

Our graduates have gone on to work for companies such as:

  • Natural England
  • the Wildlife Trusts
  • the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB)
  • Whale and Dolphin Conservation

They have also gone on to work in ecological consultancies, wildlife advisory roles in South Africa and Indonesia, in zoos and safari parks, and as research assistants worldwide.

You could also progress to postgraduate study.

Placement opportunities

Some students opt to take an industrial placement between Year Two and Year Three providing them with the opportunity to spend an additional year working in industry. This is an excellent chance to explore an aspect of wildlife conservation that might interest you as a career and at the same time significantly increase employment prospects.

Placements can be undertaken with one or several organisations, either in the UK or abroad. A placement diploma is available for students who have undertaken a substantial placement of at least 36 weeks. A placement certificate in available for students who have undertaken a shorter placement of at least 6 weeks.

What are the benefits of a work placement?

Practical work experience has many benefits for you. It can help you in your day-to-day studies and is often paid. It can enhance your commercial awareness and your ability to link theory and practice which will be an invaluable skill in your future career. Although a work placement is highly recommended, obtaining one is based on an individual’s efforts and is not guaranteed.

Students have carried out placements at companies such as:

  • EMEC Ecology and Baker Consultants
  • TRAFFIC International
  • Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
  • Rutland Water Nature Reserve
  • the Wildlife Trusts
  • Whale and Dolphin Conservation
  • West Midlands Safari Park
  • Durrell Wildlife Conservation
  • Mankwe Game Reserve (South Africa)
  • Cheetah Outreach (South Africa)

International Exchange

This course also offers the opportunity to get involved in our International Exchange programme and study abroad at another university for part of the second year. Students have previously been involved in exchanges with the University of Guelph in Canada and Murdoch University in Australia.

NTU Enterprise

You'll also have the opportunity to turn your ideas into a viable business with help from NTU Enterprise, NTU's purpose-built Centre for Entrepreneurship and Enterprise, a support centre to help students create, develop and grow their own businesses.

Campus and facilities

You will be studying in the ideal environment for Wildlife Conservation. Brackenhurst Campus is a 200-hectare estate with:

  • farmland
  • woodland
  • wetland
  • a diverse range of habitats and wildlife species.

Student research

  • Conservation students are involved in tracking, mapping and recording a wide variety of species at Brackenhurst.
  • These have included hedgehogs, badgers and roe deer.
  • Many of the techniques learnt at Brackenhurst with native species have been transferred to global research projects on wolves, hyenas and vultures.

A wildlife haven

Not only are you surrounded by beautiful countryside at Brackenhurst, but the estate is also home to a wide variety of wildlife.

Here are just some of the species you might be lucky enough to spot here:

  • badger
  • bats
  • barn owl
  • tawny owl
  • little owl
  • merlin
  • sparrow hawk
  • buzzard
  • hobby
  • kestrel
  • red kite
  • peregrine falcon
  • yellow hammer
  • tree sparrow
  • house sparrow
  • bullfinch
  • great crested newt
  • smooth newt
  • wood mouse
  • field vole
  • bank vole
  • hare

and many more.

Conservation Society

Brackenhurst Campus has a student-led Conservation Society who organise events throughout the year. These include a variety of activities including seminars, species surveys, field day trips, social events and practical tasks such as habitat management.

Entry requirements

What are we looking for?

  • A-levels – BBC, including a Science subject at grade C and excluding General Studies; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DMM, including relevant Science modules; or
  • 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications, including an A-level grade C equivalent in a Science subject; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

For this course we accept the following Science subjects: Biology, Human Biology, Environmental Studies, Ecology, Psychology and Zoology.

Applicants without A-levels will have their applications assessed for subject compatibility.

Other qualifications and experience

We consider equivalent qualifications and combinations, please see UCAS course search for details and use our calculator to help you work out how many UCAS points your qualifications relate to.

We may also consider credits achieved at other universities and your work/life experience through an assessment of prior learning. This may be for year one entry, or beyond the beginning of a course where applicable, for example, into year 2. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available for this route.

Contextual offers

As well as assessing your application and qualifications, we use contextual data and information to make offers for this course. Depending on your circumstances, we may make you an offer up to two grades below the standard entry criteria. Find out how we assess your application.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions and Enquiries Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

What are we looking for?

  • A-levels – BBC, including a Science subject at grade C and excluding General Studies; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DMM, including relevant Science modules; or
  • 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications, including an A-level grade C equivalent in a Science subject; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

For this course we accept the following Science subjects: Biology, Human Biology, Environmental Studies, Ecology, Psychology and Zoology.

Applicants without A-levels will have their applications assessed for subject compatibility.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Undergraduate preparation courses (Foundation)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Foundation courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Advanced standing (starting your undergraduate degree in year 2 or 3)

You may be able to start your undergraduate course in year 2 or 3 based on what you have studied before.  This decision would be made in accordance with our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy.

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

Additional costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which some students choose to purchase. Book costs vary between courses and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. A good supply of these essential text books are available both in paper format at the University libraries which students can easily borrow or access directly whilst studying in the library, and also in online access format.

Field trips

You will be charged a maximum of £60 for any compulsory residential trips in the UK which will contribute towards the cost of travel, accommodation and entrance fees where applicable. There will be a maximum charge of £400 for overseas residential fieldwork that is compulsory to your course. In the final year, students must choose either the Africa Field Course or the UK Field Course. Non-residential day excursions are included in the tuition fee; other non compulsory opportunities, in the UK and abroad, may also be offered and these will be charged at additional cost to students. This includes the Africa Field Course. A valid passport and any associated visas and vaccinations will also be required for field trips outside of the UK.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Other costs

All students will also be expected to provide their own appropriate fieldwork clothing, including walking boots (with ankle support), wellingtons and waterproof trousers and coat.

Tuition fees for September 2022 entry

Mode of study

International tuition fee

Full-time

£15,600

Full-time with placement

£15,600 + £1,385 (placement year)

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your undergraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Complete this simple form to keep in touch with the International Office.

Additional costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which some students choose to purchase. Book costs vary between courses and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. A good supply of these essential text books are available both in paper format at the University libraries which students can easily borrow or access directly whilst studying in the library, and also in online access format.

Field trips

You will be charged a maximum of £60 for any compulsory residential trips in the UK which will contribute towards the cost of travel, accommodation and entrance fees where applicable. There will be a maximum charge of £400 for overseas residential fieldwork that is compulsory to your course. In the final year, students must choose either the Africa Field Course or the UK Field Course. Non-residential day excursions are included in the tuition fee; other non compulsory opportunities, in the UK and abroad, may also be offered and these will be charged at additional cost to students. This includes the Africa Field Course. A valid passport and any associated visas and vaccinations will also be required for field trips outside of the UK.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Other costs

All students will also be expected to provide their own appropriate fieldwork clothing, including walking boots (with ankle support), wellingtons and waterproof trousers and coat.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can. Just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow the instructions for applying. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You’ve got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up-to-date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

You can apply for this course through UCAS. If you are not applying to any other UK universities, you can apply directly to us on our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Advice on writing a good personal statement

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

The University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.