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Cyberpsychology MSc

  • Level(s) of Study: Postgraduate taught
  • Start Date(s): September 2022
  • Duration: 1 / 2 year(s)
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time / Part-time
  • Campus: City Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

Our MSc Cyberpsychology degree will provide you with the opportunity to develop the relevant academic and professional skills to commence a successful career in cyberpsychology, the psychological study of the Internet and digital technologies. Experts in the areas of cyberpsychology, Internet and technology will deliver the course.

The course is designed for both psychology graduates and graduates of other related disciplines, for example media or IT. It may be of interest if you are seeking to pursue a career in cyberpsychology, either in any organisation that uses any form of cyberpsychology (i.e. has a web-presence) or in research or academia.

Students will gain invaluable first-hand practical experience through completion of eight weeks of work-based learning as a cyberpsychologist in a cyber-industry or other professional workplace. You will also benefit from careers advice and mentoring throughout the course.

This degree is available as both a full-time and a part-time option.

What you’ll study

This course will provide you with the foundations for the next stage of your academic and professional development, and a solid framework for a professional career in cyberpsychology or allied professions.

You’ll develop your knowledge of cyberpsychology theory and practice, and explore the ethical, cultural, political and legal issues arising in cyberpsychological practice and research. You’ll also be able to gain valuable real-life experience as a cyberpsychology practitioner through a work-based learning opportunity, and will complete a research project on a cyberpsychology theme of your choice.

*Please note that modules are subject to change.*

Core modules

Applied Psychology of Digital Technologies

This module runs across Terms One, Two, and Three. Terms One and Two include taught elements, which may cover topics such as:

  • new technologies
  • digital technologies in education and mental health and well-being
  • online research methods.

Tutorials will support you in coursework preparation, as well as preparing you for the work-based learning opportunity in Term Three and your individual work-based learning report.

Whether you wish to proceed directly into employment, further study or research, this module is designed to increase your employability and benefit your future choices.

As a student, you will be supported to secure your own work placement giving you invaluable preparation for the employment market. The eight-week work-based learning opportunity within a cyberpsychology-relevant organisation will give you the opportunity to apply your theoretical knowledge to real-life cyberpsychology practice and contribute to the everyday professional work in these organisations

Psychology of Cyberspace and Online Behaviours

You’ll explore various aspects of cyberspaces (both online and digital technology environments) and the behaviours mediated by technology. There may also be specialist lectures and seminar sessions delivered by experts in their fields, including online and video gaming, cyberspace, cybersecurity, and online relationships.

Computer Forensics

This module is taught at our Clifton Campus alongside MSc IT Security students. It highlights the breadth of cyberpsychology by incorporating a multidisciplinary approach to online behaviours. You’ll gain a critical appreciation of both the theoretical and practical issues in the field of computer forensics, consolidate your knowledge of various computing systems and understand their importance to computer forensics investigations, and develop the necessary skills, methodologies, and processes to conduct an initial computer forensics investigation within an organisation.

Module content may include:

  • computer crime and the role of computer forensics in law enforcement and the organisation
  • investigation processes and procedures
  • the computer forensics environment
  • hard drives and storage media
  • operating systems, e.g. Windows and Linux
  • computer forensics tools and techniques
  • file system and deleted data analysis
  • investigating electronic files and meta-data
  • network forensics.

Professional Skills

This module aims to equip you with the ability to plan, carry out and evaluate professional skills in a psychological setting. You’ll be introduced to a range of key professional skills necessary for the pursuit of an academic or professional career in psychology or related disciplines.

Research Project

You’ll explore and critically examine a psychological research question of your choice in the area of cyberpsychology. The research may be an empirical project, or could take the form of a non-empirical dissertation. In both cases, regular supervision will be provided to guide you in the planning, preparation, conduction, and write up of the research.

Research Skills for Cyberpsychology

The module aims to:
1. Provide practical experience of applying a range of analytic techniques to psychological data in a cyberpsychological context.
2. Enable you to fully appreciate the designing and conducting of small-scale empirical research projects.

Don’t just take our word for it, hear from our students themselves

Student Profiles

Andrea Haas

This course has enabled me to combine my passion for social networking, media and marketing with psychology and explore areas of research that give an insight into our future.

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How you’re taught

The MSc Cyberpsychology starts in late September/early October. A dedicated induction day is provided for all students which introduces you to your course, to your teaching teams and to the university facilities. The day ends with an informal social event.

The course is completed in one year of full-time study (your final piece of coursework is submitted in late August) or two years part-time. The teaching terms run from late September to Christmas and then from January to Easter. Part-time students attend for two of the three days only.

Study and support

The blend of research and practical learning is reflected in the course team, which consists of professionals working in the area of cyberpsychology and academics who have considerable experience working in the field of cyberpsychology across the UK and other countries.

You'll be assigned a personal tutor who will provide pastoral and academic support throughout your studies. A tutorial group will be held on a bi-weekly basis, where you'll be given the opportunity to reflect on practice and experiences on the course, and to provide a place for interaction and exchange with your fellow students.

The course will be delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars, laboratory or field work, and independent study. You’ll also take part in group tutorials based on experiential learning strategies, where you’ll be asked to think about your developing professional identity, course material and independent study, your personal experiences of the course, and ethical issues. You'll also make full use of the facilities provided by the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Assessment methods

During the course, you'll be assessed in a variety of ways: through practical and research reports, assessed essays, portfolios, examinations, oral presentations, and a research project.

An active research environment

Throughout the course you'll benefit from research-informed teaching. Find out more about our psychology research.

World-leading research

  • In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021, 100% of NTU's research environment in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience was assessed to be world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of quality.

In-sessional English language support

In-sessional English language support classes are available to all international (non-EU) students studying on degree courses at NTU. There is no extra charge for these classes.

Staff Profiles

Daria Kuss

Associate Professor

School of Social Sciences

Dr Daria Kuss is a Chartered Psychologist, Chartered Scientist, Associate Professor in Psychology, the Lead for the Cyberpsychology Research Group, and a member of the International Gaming Research Unit. She…

Jens Binder

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Jens Binder is a Cyberpsychologist in the Psychology Department at Nottingham Trent University. He studies online behaviours with a focus on social competence and social literacy. He also investigates social

Mark Griffiths

Distinguished Professor

School of Social Sciences

Professor Griffiths is a Chartered Psychologist and Director of the International Gaming Research Unit.

Olatz Lopez-Fernandez

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Dr Olatz Lopez-Fernandez is a Health Psychologist and Senior academic in Psychology and Educational Sciences. At present, she is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Nottingham Trent University (NTU), and…

Loren Abell

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Loren is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Loren teaches across all years of the undergraduate course and on the MSc courses at the…

Belinda Winder

Professor

Psychology

Belinda Winder

Careers and employability

Work-based learning

The eight-week work-based learning opportunity within the Applied Psychology of Digital Technologies module will provide you with invaluable experience working as a cyberpsychologist in a cyber-industry or other professional workplace. You’ll gain first-hand experience engaging with cyberactivities and will be able to apply relevant research and theory to your experiences. Examples of the type of company where you might work include: the gaming industry, online dating/social networking companies, a cybersecurity/filtering software company, academia, healthcare settings, research and education.

Your future career

Throughout the course, you'll receive one-to-one careers support and mentoring. The course team currently have links to various organisations such as Confetti Media Group, ICN, Holovis International, Fuzzy Frog, British Aerospace and Marconi Electronic Systems, Redsock, Esendex, and Boom Online.

As a graduate of MSc Cyberpsychology you'll be able to critically appraise and apply key features of cyberpsychology research and practice. Awareness of your own experiences and characteristics will inform your knowledge and skills surrounding cyberpsychology science and practice, and your work-based learning experience in a cyberpsychology setting will be a foundation for the development of core employability skills, including team-working and effective communication.

As the MSc Cyberpsychology is highly multidisciplinary, it opens up a wide range of career options because it is applicable and relevant to any organisation with an online presence. Areas which graduates may work in could include:

  • gaming
  • social networking
  • online dating websites
  • usability testing
  • consulting media industries
  • cybersecurity
  • virtual reality
  • mobile apps
  • online design
  • online marketing
  • online retail
  • journalism
  • research
  • education
  • healthcare.

Please note that for some careers, further study and / or a BPS-accredited conversion course conferring Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership may be required.

Employability team

Our expert Employability team will work closely with you at every stage of your career planning, providing personal support and advice. You can benefit from this service at any time during your studies, and for up to three years after completing your course. Find out more about the service.

Campus and facilities

As a psychology student you will benefit from our dedicated learning environment. We have specialist research laboratories including eye trackers, motion capture labs and an £80,000 EEG system. These facilities support staff research as well as student projects in the exciting areas of human cognition, behavioural neuroscience, human interaction and communication, and human development. Find out more about these specialist facilities.

You will also have easy access to fantastic facilities in the Chaucer and Taylor buildings including:

  • Lecture theatres and teaching classrooms;
  • Open access PCs and secure wireless points;
  • Study areas and social spaces;
  • Chaucer cafe serving drinks and light snacks;
  • Our brand new School of Social Sciences reception, providing you with easy access to our helpful and friendly support staff.

IT resources

Our IT resource rooms and PC clusters are distributed across our City Campus, with PCs providing access to Microsoft Office, email, web browsing, networked file storage and high-speed online printing services, with a free printing allowance for each student.

Resource rooms are available 24 hours a day.

Books and library resources

Our state-of-the-art Boots library will give you access to an extensive and diverse range of books and periodicals that focus on specialist areas within the built environment. The library's OneSearch system provides access to all our electronic resources, journals and books.

Within the library there is a liaison librarian who has specialist subject knowledge and can offer detailed help in finding and using print and electronic resources, and also with areas such as Harvard referencing and research skills.

Entry requirements

Applying with prior qualifications

  • You'll need an undergraduate degree (minimum 2.2) in Psychology (or a related subject) or other recognised equivalent qualification. Related subjects include Media Studies, Media Culture, Communication Studies, Journalism, Psychology, Health Sciences, Psychopathology, Mental Health, Information Technology, Security, Sociology, and Research Methods.

Applying with non-standard entry qualifications/experience

  • Applicants without such qualifications will be considered on an individual basis but will be required to demonstrate how their experiences and knowledge would enable them to study this course at Masters level in their personal statement.

Other requirements

Your application form requires a written statement in which you should outline reasons for wishing to undertake the MSc Cyberpsychology. We will be looking to ensure that you have a sound rationale for joining the course based on a realistic appreciation of the discipline and profession of psychology. Appropriate theoretical knowledge, work experience or an interest in working in the area of cyberpsychology will be considered advantageous, alongside personal attributes, such as interest in technology and good communication skills, which are essential for a career in cyberpsychology.

Applicants who are successful following assessment of their application form by the course team will be invited to a face-to-face interview with members of the course team. This may involve completion of psychometric tests, a problem-based task, and/or group work.

If you are unsure of your status and / or would like an informal discussion with the course leader, please contact us.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions team or call +44 (0)115 848 4200.

  • You'll need an undergraduate degree (minimum 2.2) in Psychology (or a related subject) or other recognised equivalent qualification. Related subjects include Media Studies, Media Culture, Communication Studies, Journalism, Psychology, Health Sciences, Psychopathology, Mental Health, Information Technology, Security, Sociology, and Research Methods.
  • Applicants without such qualifications will be considered on an individual basis, but will be required to demonstrate how their experiences and knowledge would enable them to study this course at Masters level in their personal statement.

Other requirements

Your application form requires a written statement in which you should outline reasons for wishing to undertake the MSc Cyberpsychology. We will be looking to ensure that you have a sound rationale for joining the course based on a realistic appreciation of the discipline and profession of cyberpsychology. Appropriate theoretical knowledge, work experience or an interest in working in the area of cyberpsychology will be considered advantageous, alongside personal attributes, such as interest in technology and good communication skills, which are essential for a career in cyberpsychology.

Applicants who are successful, following assessment of their application form by the course team, will be invited to an interview with members of the course team. This may involve completion of psychometric tests, a problem-based task, and / or group work.

If you are unsure of your status and / or would like an informal discussion with the course leader, please contact us.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Postgraduate preparation courses (Pre-Masters)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Pre-Masters courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Study route Home (UK students)
Full-time £7,700
Part-time (cost per year of study) £3,850 (for Year One*)

Fees are for 2022 entry.

* Please note that if you are considering a part-time route that runs over more than one year, the tuition fee stated is for Year One of study. The course fee for Year Two is subject to annual review.

Funding your studies

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there's no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

There are numerous sources of funding available for postgraduate students, both from external sources such as the Government and funding bodies, and from the University.

There are two main costs involved with postgraduate study: the cost of your tuition fees which is paid directly to the University, and living expenses such as accommodation, travel and food.

You might be able to get a scholarship to help fund your studies, We award scholarships to those students who can demonstrate excellent achievement, passion and dedication to their studies.

Please take a look at our postgraduate fees and funding page for information about sourcing grants, bursaries and scholarships, and much more.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

Study routeInternational / EU students
Full-time £15,850
Part-time (cost per year of study) £7,925 (for Year One*)

Fees are for 2022 entry.

* Please note that if you are considering a part-time route that runs over more than one year, the tuition fee stated is for Year One of study. The course fee for Year Two is subject to annual review.

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your postgraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Complete this simple form to keep in touch with the International Office

How to apply

All applications to this course can be made through our NTU Applicant Portal.

You can apply for this course throughout the year. Most of our postgraduate courses are popular and fill up quickly though, so apply as soon as you can. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

The course starts in late September/early October 2022, so in order to receive enrolment materials in good time, we advise that applications are submitted before the end of July 2022. Please allow additional processing time for international applications from countries that require a visa.

Writing your application

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. Make sure you include as much information as possible, including uploading evidence of results already achieved, as well as a personal statement.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU in our postgraduates’ guide.

All applications welcome

We welcome applications from prospective students with a range of qualifications and experience, and all are assessed on an individual basis. Applicants who do not meet the standard entry criteria can still be considered providing they have relevant experience to compliment any qualifications. All applicants will need to apply through our NTU Applicant Portal.

If you're applying without prior qualifications, you'll need to submit comprehensive details of your achievements with evidence to substantiate your claim (any documentation can be uploaded to the My Documents section of the Applicant Portal). This type of application will be considered with respect to the University’s provision for ‘accreditation for prior experiential learning’. Decisions regarding the accreditation of prior learning are a matter of academic judgement.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) formally known as a Criminal Record Bureau check

Many students choose to collect research data in the UK as part of their projects. You may be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service check depending on your project topic.

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process - so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Open days

The School of Social Sciences holds open events throughout the year. Come along and learn more about our courses, speak to programme leaders and find out about studying with the School.

Getting in touch

If you need more help or support, you can call our Admissions Team on +44 (0)115 848 4200, or contact us at Ask NTU.

Good luck with your application!

Apply online through our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

The University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) formally known as a Criminal Record Bureau check

Many students from overseas choose to collect research data in the UK as part of their projects. DBS checks only cover students from the UK, so unless you have been resident in the UK for five years or more, we will need a criminal record check from your home country if you plan to work with vulnerable populations. Checks from overseas can sometimes be referred to by a variety of names such as a Police Check or a Good Behaviour Record. To find out what it is called in your home country and how to apply for one, please visit the government website.

If you are an overseas student and are planning to collect data for your research project from vulnerable populations in your home country, you are advised to apply for a home police check to support your research. You will need to demonstrate in your ethics form that you have met all the requirements of your home country to work with vulnerable populations.

If you are unable to obtain a home Police Check and still wish to work with vulnerable populations in your home country, discuss this with your Course Leader in the first instance. It will need to be made clear in your written correspondence with any participants / organisations that the University has been unable to engage with any disclosure and barring service checks prior to you undertaking your research.

Once you have obtained your police check, a copy of the documentation (in English) should be passed to the relevant course administrator in the School of Social Sciences Office.