Skip to content

Education Studies BA (Hons)

  • Level(s) of Study: Undergraduate
  • UCAS Code(s): X312
  • Start Date(s): September 2023
  • Duration: Three years full-time
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time
  • Campus: Clifton Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

Are you ready for a future in education but want to keep your career options open? Our dynamic BA (Hons) Education Studies degree lets you do just that. You will take learning beyond the classroom, as you study education in its broadest sense. This unique course covers early years through to adult education - exploring a diverse range of subject areas, including sociology, policy, globalisation, technology, and social justice.

With a wide range of modules, you will have the freedom to build your own degree in line with your specific interests and career aims. Topics include education with a teaching focus; art, culture and heritage; youth studies and globalisation.

From day one, we will help you give real-life context to your studies and gain hands-on experience. Enhanced work-based learning and placement opportunities available through the Nottingham Institute of Education (NIoE) will give you industry experience - making you even more attractive to future employers. So, whether you’re new to the world of work or are planning a career change, you will be well prepared with our extensive network of 600 partnerships in settings, schools, colleges and the community.

  • Freedom to build your own degree with the choice of a wide range of modules in line with your specific interests and career aims.
  • Hands-on experience throughout your degree in a variety of educational employment roles through over 600 partnerships with local settings, schools, colleges and organisations.
  • Work-based learning opportunities are embedded throughout the course. You will have the opportunity to access a placement experience in Year One, Two and Three.
  • In Year Three, achieve up to 40 integrated credits at level 7, allowing you to submit work at Masters level, giving you the opportunity to transition APAL onto a part-time Masters in education programme.

What you’ll study

Our BA (Hons) Education Studies degree explores how people develop and learn throughout their lives. You will analyse education, drawing upon a range of disciplines, including sociology, policy, globalisation, technology and social justice.

You will examine how people have experienced education and how society and culture influence what is taught and how. Throughout the course, you will consider education as being something that happens in both classroom and community contexts. Government policy and initiatives will be explored to identify how policy affects local, national and international educational practices, as well as peoples’ life chances.

Each year has a key focus that will allow you to think as an educationalist.

In Year One, the course provides a solid grounding for understanding the multi- and interdisciplinary nature of education.

Core Modules

Outdoor Learning (20 credit points)

  • This module allows you to gain hands-on experience within an outdoor learning environment.
  • You’ll explore the potential of outdoor learning environments in supporting young children in their learning and overall development.
  • You’ll consider how outdoor learning is being used to support learners from early years and throughout childhood development within formal education and beyond.

What is Education? (20 credit points)

  • This module examines the process of education, as well as its wider meaning within society and politics.
  • You’ll consider what education is, who it is for, and how power relations shape educational experiences.
  • Key educational issues at national and international level will be explored in several contexts including formal, informal and alternative forms of education throughout life.

Developing Learning (20 credit points)

  • This module explores the process of learning and how we can integrate this into formal education.
  • You’ll consider: the way adults learn; the roles of the learner and the educator; approaches to learning; planning, design and organisation of learning and delivery methods.

Academic Skills(20 credit points)

  • This module supports you in your transition into Higher Education and in understanding what is expected at this level of study and beyond.
  • You’ll gain the essential skills needed to be successful in your academic journey.

Community Education ChalleNGe (40 credit points)

  • This year-long module examines how culture and education are linked to community education.
  • You’ll focus on the links between diverse local communities, language, youth, culture and international education in all formal settings.
  • You’ll also work with Nottingham Trent University (NTU) ChalleNGe to apply concepts learned and help the local community.

In Year Two, the course will enhance your theoretical knowledge as you think about how your own research could contribute to the field of education. You will take part in a year-long experiential learning and placement module. Placements can be in a wide range of educational settings, locally, regionally, nationally or even internationally.

Core Modules

Experiential Learning & Placement (40 credit points)

  • This year-long module explores the broader contexts in which your studies take place, within Education and Social Justice.
  • You’ll develop professional skills through work-based learning in a placement setting relevant to your career goals.
  • Whilst on your placement, you’ll be expected to reflect critically upon your own individual placement experiences.

Education Policy and Practice (20 credit points)

  • This module covers education policy, along with historical and contemporary political trends in education.
  • You’ll explore key debates within education policy and policymaking, as well as the political thinking driving policy reform.
  • You’ll be encouraged to consider the ways in which education policy is carried out across all phases of education nationally and internationally.

Research Methods in Education (20 credit points)

  • This module gives you knowledge and training on research methods in education, which will equip you to independently carry out a research project.
  • You’ll cover the understanding, designing and application of research instruments that are relevant to the field of education.
  • You’ll gain skills in a range of methodological approaches, philosophies and strategies.

Optional Modules

You’ll choose one option A module and one option B module.

Option A Modules

Youth Health & Well-being (20 credit points)

  • This module introduces health and health care in Britain – an increasingly significant topic for those involved in providing services to young people.
  • You’ll gain the practical skills needed to run effective health promotion campaigns.
  • This will give you context and concepts related to health giving you an understanding of some of the health impacts on young people and the population.

Learning through Arts & Culture (20 credit points)

  • This module explores elements of theory, policy and practices regarding motivation to learn.
  • You’ll look at the arts in education, focusing on debates surrounding the delivery of arts in Early Year Foundation Stage and the National Curriculum.

Inclusive Education in a Global World (20 credit points)

  • This module introduces marginalisation in education and in a wider society.
  • You’ll focus on specific marginalised groups targeted by inclusion-focused initiatives in education.
  • You’ll cover international projects that allow the development of inclusive education.
  • You’ll also consider ways in which inclusion-related efforts could be improved as well as their limitations.

Navigating the Classroom and Curriculum (20 credit points)

  • This module reflects on the professional roles and responsibilities of the primary school teacher.
  • You’ll learn about a range of approaches to support planning, teaching and assessment across the Key Stages.
  • You’ll be supported in developing a reflective and resilient approach.

Option B Modules

Education and Young People (20 credit points)

  • This module reflects on the increasingly varied landscape of education in Britain today.
  • You’ll explore long-standing and emerging inequalities within education.
  • You’ll be equipped with the practical skills needed to be able to design your own educational resource tailored for a group of young people in an informal or alternative educational provision.

Object-based Learning: Combining Arts & Culture with the Classroom (20 credit points)

  • This module examines the role of arts in educational, cultural and community settings.
  • You’ll select an object as a focus for interpretation into the curriculum.
  • You’ll learn about the historical and cultural references, as well as the form and function of the object.

Comparative and International Education (20 credit points)

  • This module engages with debates about different educational philosophies and approaches both nationally and internationally.
  • You’ll explore alternative approaches to formal education such as Steiner Schools, Montessori Schools and Radical Education.

Sociology of Education (20 credit points)

  • This module explores the origins of the sociology of education.
  • You’ll explore the impact of race, class and gender on educational experiences.
  • You’ll consider the ways in which education contributes to issues of social justice and patterns of equality and inequality.
  • The module will cover in-depth analysis of key thinkers in relation to the sociology of education with specific consideration of cultural reproduction theory, critical race theory and feminist theory.

In Year Three, you will create your own research project in line with your interests continuing your opportunities to gain experience and develop a portfolio. This will be completed alongside your selected modules. You can submit up to two of your assessments at Master level. Achieving these Masters credits will allow you to transition (APL) on to the Part-time Master’s in education within NIoE, or flexible Masters programmes elsewhere.

Core Modules

Research Project: Research in Education (40 credit points)

  • With this year-long module, you’ll research and write a dissertation in an area of your own academic interest, in relation to education.

Social Justice and Morality (20 credit points)

  • This module engages with global issues of social justice and discourses around morality.
  • You’ll consider and analyse the question: What is fair?’ You’ll critically evaluate your own understanding of equity and use specialist skills to critically discuss the experience of others in different international settings.

Education and Digital Technology - Teaching and Learning in an Online World (20 credit points)

  • This module examines how digital and online technologies influence education throughout life.
  • You’ll examine societal attitudes, socio-economic factors on current education policies and practices.
  • You’ll consider the role of the teacher in the delivery of effective practice within mainstream education and beyond.

Optional Modules

You’ll choose one option A module and one option B module.

Option A Modules

Advice and Guidance in Practice (20 credit points)

  • This module explores definitions of counselling, advice and guidance.
  • Whether you wish to specialise in one of the guidance professions or simply broaden your knowledge of this aspect of working with people, you’ll gain an understanding of the skills, qualities and attitudes needed to be an effective guidance practitioner.

Race, Media and Popular Culture (20 credit points)

  • This module examines the complex relations between race, media and popular culture.
  • You’ll cover how it has impacted on issues of identity, representation, appropriation, cancel culture and belonging for children and young people in the last few decades.
  • You’ll study minoritized students and staff in education, and the ways that mainstream education currently marginalises a wide range of learners and potential learners by perpetuating coloniality, eurocentrism, elitism and sexism.

Global Citizenship and Education for Sustainable Development (20 credit points)

  • This module covers global inequalities in terms of education, access to health, clean water and nutritious food.
  • You’ll cover development throughout the last half century and link education in the global south with the concept of Development Education, Global Citizenship and Education for Sustainable Development in the UK.

Forced migration and education: Key issues (20 credit points)

  • This module allows you to engage with key issues pertinent to forced migration and the way these issues relate to education at all levels.
  • You’ll gain a solid understanding of forced migration and the challenges it creates especially with regards to access to education and educational opportunities.
  • Issues of human rights will be discussed with references to historical and contemporary cases of forced migration.

Option B Modules

Informal, Inclusive and Alternative Education (20 credit points)

  • This module introduces the theory, policy and practice of educational work with young people through informal, alternative and inclusive education.
  • You’ll develop the knowledge, skills and understanding to work effectively with young people individually or in groups and facilitate their informal learning and personal development.
  • You’ll undertake a work experience placement in an educational setting which will enable you to plan, deliver and evaluate an educational intervention with young people.

Society, Culture and Identity (20 credit points)

  • This module considers the concept of identity within the various communities.
  • You’ll explore the processes of identity construction in relation to educational policy and practice.
  • You’ll also consider the constantly (re)negotiated process and examine the transformative process of identity.
  • You’ll investigate how individuals navigate daily life and negotiate identity. Barriers which limit options, and therefore, limit choice in education will be examined.

Education in a Globalised World (20 credit points)

  • This module links global inequalities in the economy to those in education.
  • The module uses post-colonial theory to explore the historical background of colonialism and imperialism to set the current context of the continuing global struggle for educational equality.
  • You’ll also explore the impact of recent global educational policies on countries in the global South and how Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) have had relative economic and educational successes.

Radical Education (20 credit points)

  • This module engages with theoretical frameworks and scholars giving a voice to minoritized people who would otherwise be excluded from the formal education systems.
  • In addition, you’ll consider the role of African Caribbean supplementary Saturday schools, church groups, community arts organisations and other community groups in providing educational opportunities and experiences for people within their communities and in supporting vulnerable young people.

How you’re taught

How will I study?

We've introduced flexible and innovative ways of learning and teaching to develop your study skills and understanding of the integration of theory and practice.

Learning and teaching methods include:

  • active collaborative learning
  • lectures
  • seminar discussions
  • practical and project work
  • workshops
  • placements, experiential learning and work-like experiences.

How will I be assessed?

There are no formal exams during these courses; we use a variety of assessment types to allow you to demonstrate your strengths across a number of skill sets.

Excellent placement opportunities

Throughout this course there are several opportunities to explore different career ambitions and gain workplace experience. In Year One, students have the opportunity collaborate with ChalleNGe, Nottingham’s Cultural Education Partnership, to engage in partnerships between education provides and cultural experiences. To help you acquire real-work experience, you will be provided different work placements each year, in and beyond formal educational settings, such as schools, voluntary groups, museums.

In Year Two, students will experience two types of educational settings: one non-school and one school-based so you can more fully appreciate how education takes place not only in the classrooms, but throughout communities as well.

Putting your studies into practice helps you to understand your subject and its application in real-life. Placement opportunities support you both professionally and personally by ensuring you develop the key skills that will make you more employable at the end of your studies.

Contact hours

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (17%), independent study (75%) and placement (8%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (24%), independent study (54%) and placement (22%)
  • Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (17%), independent study (75%) and placement (8%)

Staff Profiles

Katherine Friend

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Katherine Friend

Neil Stott

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Neil Stott

Dr Iryna Kushnir

Senior Lecturer

Nottingham Institute of Education

Learn more about Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Education Studies and Early Years, Dr Iryna Kushnir.

Alex Kosogorin

Senior Lecturer

Nottingham Institute of Education

Read about Alex Kosogorin, Senior Lecturer and Course Leader for BA (Hons) Education Studies.

How you’re assessed

  • Year 1 coursework (100%)
  • Year 2 coursework (100%)
  • Year 3 coursework (100%)

Careers and employability

Your career development

What skills will I develop?

You develop specific skills relating to educational issues, theories of learning, equality and diversity, education policy and practice, creativity and education, and a general understanding of education in social, political and economic contexts.

You also gain skills that are useful in a variety of job sectors:

  • communication skills - presenting effective oral and written arguments
  • IT skills
  • research and analytical skills
  • interpersonal skills with the ability to work collaboratively as part of a team
  • problem-solving skills
  • organisation and time management skills - prioritising your academic/part-time workloads and reflecting on and improving personal practice.

How can I boost my career prospects?

Achieving Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) through completion of the PGCE or equivalent postgraduate qualification is a popular route for Education graduates.

Alternatively, you may wish to take a Masters course in education or a related social science in order to develop your understanding of the theory, research and policy of education, and to enhance your professional knowledge, skills and practice. Some Education  graduates go on to study for a PhD in education.

Your future career

Our Education Studies degrees allows graduates to progress into a number of employment opportunities. Some choose to become teachers or work in community / council leadership, while others continue onto postgraduate study. Ultimately, this degree provides graduates with choices. We understand that as a student develops, so do their interests.

This Education degree will provide a framework for a wide variety of possible careers. As well as roles based in schools and colleges, students may also consider sectors such as social work, refugee support, training, human resource management and many others. Our graduates* are following a variety of career paths including roles as:

  • Educational Developer
  • Youth Development Worker
  • Volunteer Coordinator
  • Careers Leader
  • Museum Educator
  • Community Outreach Coordinator
  • Academic Advisor
  • Higher Level Teaching Assistant
  • Student Support Officer.

Links with industry

We involve industry experts in our courses in a number of ways.

  • We consult with employers when we design and update our courses.
  • We ensure you are prepared to meet the demands of the workplace by continually checking the currency and validity of our courses with employers.
  • You will have the opportunity to have a work placement (if not already in paid or voluntary employment).
  • Employers may input directly into your course through guest lectures, projects, and other work-related activities.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study you also have the opportunity to learn a new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have.

Learning a new language can:

  • enhance your communication skills
  • enrich your experience when travelling abroad
  • boost your career prospects.

Find out more about the University Language Programme.

Guaranteed interview scheme: teacher-training

One of the benefits of the course is the broad knowledge and experience you will gain. This experience may lead you to consider teaching, even if you have not considered this as a career before.

If you complete your degree, you are guaranteed an interview for a PGCE Primary teacher-training course at NTU during your final undergraduate year (subject to places being available).

Terms and conditions apply:

  • Applications will be withdrawn and not be progressed to interview stage once all places are filled on relevant courses
  • Interviews are subject to you meeting the essential entry criteria for the PGCE course at the time of application, such as GCSE requirements, degree grade
  • An interview does not guarantee an offer to study on the course.

Alumni Discount

Students continuing with postgraduate study at NTU may be eligible for 20% off postgraduate course fees as part of our Alumni Discount.

Campus and facilities

Entry requirements

What are we looking for?

  • 104 - 112 UCAS Tariff points from up to four qualifications.
  • GCSE English and Maths grade C / 4.

To find out what qualifications have tariff points, please use our tariff calculator.


Other requirements:

You will also need to complete:

Contextual offers

A lower offer may be made based on a range of factors, including your background (such as where you live and the school or college you attended), your experiences and individual circumstances (you may have been in care, for example). This is called a contextual offer and we get data from UCAS to make these decisions. NTU offers a student experience like no other and this approach helps us to find students who have the potential to succeed here but who may have faced barriers that make it more difficult to access university. Find out how we assess your application.

Other qualifications and experience

We may also consider credits achieved at other universities and your work/life experience through an assessment of prior learning. This may be for year one entry, or beyond the beginning of a course where applicable, for example, into year 2. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available for this route.

Getting in touch

If you need more help or information, get in touch through our enquiry form.

What are we looking for?

  • 112 UCAS Tariff points from up to four qualifications
  • GCSE English and Maths grade C / 4.

Other requirements

You will also need to complete:

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Undergraduate preparation courses (Foundation)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Foundation courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Advanced standing (starting your undergraduate degree in year 2 or 3)

You may be able to start your undergraduate course in year 2 or 3 based on what you have studied before.  This decision would be made in accordance with our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy.

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

Additional Costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. Our libraries provide a good supply of essential text books, journals and materials (many of which you can access online) – meaning you may not need to purchase as many books as you might think! There may also be a supply of second-hand books available for purchase from previous year students.

Field trips

All essential field trip costs will be included in your course fees. There may be the opportunity to take part in optional field trips, which do incur additional costs.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Tuition fees for September 2023 entry

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your undergraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government. Visit our fees page for more information.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Additional Costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. Our libraries provide a good supply of essential text books, journals and materials (many of which you can access online) – meaning you may not need to purchase as many books as you might think! There may also be a supply of second-hand books available for purchase from previous year students.

Field trips

All essential field trip costs will be included in your course fees. There may be the opportunity to take part in optional field trips, which do incur additional costs.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Students completing the four year degree may choose to apply for a study abroad option instead of a work placement (or a mixture of study abroad and work placement) during the third year of the course. If successful, students will be expected to pay for accommodation, travel and living costs whilst on study abroad/placement. Travel grants and Erasmus funding may be available to help fund international travel costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can. Just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow the instructions for applying. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You’ve got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Diversity of our students

We are committed to promoting a diverse and representative body of teacher trainees. We welcome applications from under-represented groups, such as male applicants, applicants from BME communities, mature applicants and those with disabilities.

All applicants welcome

We welcome applications from prospective students with a range of qualifications and experience, and all are assessed on an individual basis. Mature applicants who do not meet the standard entry criteria can still be considered providing they have relevant experience to compliment any qualifications. All applicants will need to apply through UCAS.

Keeping up-to-date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

You can apply for this course through UCAS. If you are not applying to any other UK universities, you can apply directly to us on our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

The University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

More from Nottingham Institute of Education